Featured Articles

Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

We broke the news of Nvidia's ambitious gaming tablet plans back in May and now the Shield tablet got a bit…

More...
Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia has announced its first Android tablet and when we say Nokia, we don’t mean Microsoft. The Nokia N1 was designed…

More...
Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell is better known for its storage controllers, but the company doesn’t want to give up on the smartphone and…

More...
TSMC 16nm FinFET Plus in risk production

TSMC 16nm FinFET Plus in risk production

TSMC’s next generation 16nm process has reached an important milestone – 16nm FinFET Plus (16FF+) is now in risk production.

More...
Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia recently released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture, with exceptional performance-per-watt. The Geforce GTX 970…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 14 July 2014 11:57

Copyright claim against Creative Commons bloke

Written by Nick Farrell



Ironic, don’t you think

A documentary about the late Internet activist who helped create the Creative Commons has been taken down from YouTube by a copyright claim.

The Internet's Own Boy is a documentary on Aaron Swartz's life, suicide, and legacy, was released June 27 after making the rounds at film festivals. Swartz committed suicide in January 2013 at the age of 26, after he was hounded to death by prosecutors keen to show it was tough on hackers. He downloaded a cache of academic journals from JSTOR through MIT's network and prosecutors wanted him locked up for 60 years.

The Internet's Own Boy has a multifaceted distribution model: It's available in certain theatres, through paid streaming services like Amazon Prime, and for free online. It was released to keeping with Swartz's ideals of free flow of information and director Brian Knappenberger chose to make the film Creative Commons-licensed, meaning anyone can use the material without fear of copyright infringement. However, on Friday anyone trying to see the documentary was greeted by the message, "This video is no longer available due to a copyright claim by Remove Your Media LLC." This is a company that specializes in sending copyright takedowns in accordance with the law that governs them, the Digital Millenium Copyright Act (DMCA).

A representative for Remove Your Media, Eric Greene, refused to name the client who hired him for the takedown, though he said it was "a distributor outside the U.S." One of the film's US distributors attributed the takedown to "miscommunication."

The video was back over the weekend and it still a mystery who took it down.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments