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Thursday, 17 July 2014 12:23

Privacy watchdog probes itself

Written by Nick Farrell



Data security breach

A UK privacy watchdog that holds responsibility for protecting the nation’s private information has had a data security breach that took place under its own roof.

Christopher Graham, the Information Commissioner (ICO), revealed yesterday that his office had suffered a “non-trivial data security incident” within the year, which prompted a full internal investigation. The regulator said it investigated and treated the matter no differently from similar incidents reported to it.

“We also conducted an internal investigation. It was concluded that the likelihood of damage or distress to any affected data subjects was low and that it did not amount to a serious breach of the Data Protection Act,” it said.

Phew that would be a relief if your own internal investigation cleared you, you would not have to fine yourself. Normally the ICO does not fine people that much or that often, it probably let itself off with a stiff warning.

Nick Farrell

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