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Monday, 28 July 2014 09:30

App market reaches saturation point

Written by Nick Farrell



No more money in them thar hills

While people are worried about peak oil, it appears that the app market has also reached saturation point. While Apple and Google were busy proving each other’s superiority by the size of their App libraries, no one actually thought “are there too many out there.” Now it seems the App gold rush is crashing. 

A new, giant survey of 10,000 app developers from around the world reveals that apps will almost certainly not succeed. The State of the Developer Nation Q3 2014 said that only two percent of all app developers pull in over half of all app revenue.

"The revenue distribution is so heavily skewed towards the top that just 1.6 per cent of developers make multiples of the other 98.4 per cent combined." A staggering 47 per cent of app developers either make literally no money, or less than $100 per month, per app. 

Part of the problem is that there are too many apps. Apple has a million of them and and unless you're in the tippy-top of tippiest-top, odds are nobody will even notice you exist. VisionMobile, which conducted the study, concludes that "It seems extremely unlikely the market can sustain anything like the current level of developers for many more years."

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