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Wednesday, 30 July 2014 12:32

British workers ignore Facebook bans

Written by Nick Farrell



Boss can shove off

British companies are having no luck at enforce bans on Facebook. British employees are the most likely in Europe to ignore workplace restrictions on social media, with two in five admitting to using Facebook at work even though they know it is banned.

Of British workers whose Facebook access is restricted, 41 per cent admitted to accessing the site while at work, according to a the study of 4,500 office workers by Samsung Electronics. The next highest were the Germans, with 34 per cent ignoring workplace bans, followed by the Spanish 33per cent, Italians, 32 percent and Belgians and Dutch 31 per cent. Oddly one of the most likely nations to surrender to a work place anti-Facebook policy is France, with only one in five prepared to follow orders.

Younger workers aged 18 to 34 were more likely to tell their bosses to go forth and multiply and stick their corporate restrictions. These employees either ignored workplace bans, or used their own technology to overcome work-imposed restrictions. Samsung said the research suggests that corporate restrictions on Internet use are fuelled by a lack of trust shown by some European bosses.

Only half of all workers in the survey said that their employers gave them freedom to use technology as they wish, while almost a fifth said that their employers are technologically retarded. The thinking is that they impose extreme restrictions because they are too stupid to know any better.

Nick Farrell

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