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Monday, 18 August 2014 13:36

Germans and British disagree on privacy

Written by Nick Farrell

And ownership of Belgium and 1966 World Cup

A survey of 1,000 Germans and 1,000 Brits has found that these two nations have different views when it comes to privacy.

According to a OnePoll survey, conducted for mobile security outfit Silent Circle, Brits are scared that their mobile communications are being invaded than Germans. Apparently the Germans are more likely to spend cash to prevent the invasion.

The study found that 88 per cent of UK workers believe their calls and texts are being listened to, versus 72 per cent of Germans. When asked if they’d buy a phone, or subscribe to a service, that protected calls/texts from eavesdroppers, a third of Germans (33 per cent) would sign up with almost a quarter of Brits (23 per cent) willing to exchange cash for privacy.

Vic Hyder, Revenue Chief for Silent Circle said that these figures confirm that many consumers recognise mobile communications are no longer private. He said that it was also reassuring that almost a quarter of the UK respondents, and a third of Germans, value their privacy enough to pay for help keeping the spooks out. 

Nick Farrell

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