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Monday, 18 August 2014 14:35

Oracle builds complex chip

Written by Nick Farrell

Bets Intel’s 15-core Xeon IvyBridge-EX

Oracle has released a new server chip which appears to be giving Intel a run for its money.

The M7, which appropriately follows the M6, will have 32 cores, 20 more compared to its predecessor and will use a new core design called the S4.

It uses a 20nm manufacturing process but with a 16nm FinFET 3D manufacturing node from TSMC, it is expected to pack 10 billion transistors.

That many transistors is nearly double the 15-core Xeon IvyBridge-EX. Each CPU contains eight quad-core clusters with a shared 64MB L3 cache and an aggregate bandwidth of over 1.6TB/s. A core can manage eight threads and can access 64GB of RAM.

Oracle claims that it can offer performance improvements of up to 400 per cent depending on the tasks. In addition, it will be scalable to up to 32-sockets on one system and allow up to 1024 cores per system.

John Fowler, executive vice president for Oracle's systems business, said the chips would include built-in accelerators that will allow the processor to excel on certain specific tasks that are tied to Oracle's products.

Nick Farrell

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