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Thursday, 21 August 2014 11:21

Google processes a million take-downs daily

Written by Nick Farrell



Big Content goes mental

Google is now processing an average of one million removal requests daily as Big Content gets more obsessive about allegedly infringing search results. Requests have increased dramatically since Google began making the data public going from a few dozen takedown notices during an entire year to millions of allegedly infringing links per week.

Last week Google was asked to remove more than 7.8 million results, up more than 10 per cent compared to the previous record a week earlier. So that is basically one request every 8 milliseconds. As a result, some notices reference pages that contain no copyrighted material but have been placed automatically due to mistakes or abuse. To be fair, Google is pretty good at catching these, but still it is fairly silly.

Big Content however says that Google is still not doing enough and it will not be able to rest until the last pirate is strangled with the entrails of the last Pirate site owner. The RIAA for example claims that the huge number of take down requests is not indicative of Big Content taking the Nintendo out of the system, but the fact that there are a lot of pirates out there.

The RIAA wants entire domains banned if infringing content is found.

Nick Farrell

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