Featured Articles

Intel takes credit for three-way 4K gaming

Intel takes credit for three-way 4K gaming

All of a sudden Intel is talking about desktop gaming like there is no tomorrow and it is pushing it. The…

More...
Nvidia Shield Tablet 32GB 4G LTE out for pre orders

Nvidia Shield Tablet 32GB 4G LTE out for pre orders

Nvidia has finally revealed the shipping date of its Shield Tablet 32GB in 4G LTE flavour and in case you pre-order…

More...
Apple announces its Apple Watch

Apple announces its Apple Watch

Apple has finally unveiled its eagerly awaited smartwatch and surprisingly it has dropped the "i" from the brand, calling it simply…

More...
Skylake 14nm announced

Skylake 14nm announced

Kirk B. Skaugen, Senior Vice President General Manager, PC Client Group has showcased Skylake, Intel’s second generation 14nm architecture.

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 29 August 2014 10:50

US government wants to work out memes

Written by Nick Farrell

Spends a million to find out

Indiana University is receiving nearly $1 million in federal grant money to work out how Internet memes are born, how they spread and die.

The National Science Foundation will award four Indiana researchers $919,917 to for a project called Truthy that will, as the grant’s abstract explains, “explore why some ideas cause viral explosions while others are quickly forgotten.” The idea is to discover which memes are organic and which ones are political manipulations by groups keen to brain wash people.

The theory is that while the vast majority of memes arise in a perfectly organic manner, driven by the complex mechanisms of life on the Web, some are engineered by the shady machinery of high-profile congressional campaigns, the researchers site said. Truthy pulls in tweets using what its website calls a “Gardenhose,” deletes messages that are deemed “unlikely to contain political discussion,” and highlights hashtags, usernames, and Web addresses in the remaining tweets. The project can evaluate “thousands of tweets an hour.”

What is strange is that the early research is that this trick is being used by US conservatives to manipulate American thought and some are already complaining that state money should not be used to reveal their secrets.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments