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Friday, 25 May 2007 13:33

HD DVD and Blu-ray copies to become legal?

Written by test
ImageImage

AACS LA might compromise


It seems like all the trouble that has been cause by the circumvention of the AACS copy protection of HD DVD and Blu-ray media has made the AACS LA wake up and smell the coffee.

According to an article over at InfoWorld, the AACS LA is in talks with the movie industry to work out a way to legally allow owners of high definition media to copy their disc for backup purposes.

If this agreement is reached, you would also be allowed to make a second copy for your home media server, so you could stream the video to anywhere in your house.

The AACS LA is optimistic that this would prevent a lot of pirating of high def video content, but we're sceptical that this will change anything.

What is even more worrying is that the movie companies are considering charging more for these new "copyable" discs and even have a new pricing structure based on how many copies you can make of each disc.

This sounds like another way to rip the consumers off to us and although we're not promoting piracy in any way what so ever, this just seems like another way for the movie industry to make more money out of HD content.

You can read the full story here

Last modified on Friday, 25 May 2007 13:51

test

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