Error
  • JUser::_load: Unable to load user with id: 67

Featured Articles

Nvidia Shield 2 shows up in AnTuTu

Nvidia Shield 2 shows up in AnTuTu

Nvidia’s original Shield console launched last summer to mixed reviews. It went on sale in the US and so far Nvidia…

More...
AMD CSO John Byrne talks ARM

AMD CSO John Byrne talks ARM

We had a chance to talk about AMD’s upcoming products with John Byrne, Chief Sales Officer, AMD. We covered a number…

More...
AMD Chief Sales Officer thinks GPU leadership is critical

AMD Chief Sales Officer thinks GPU leadership is critical

We had a chance to talk to John Byrne who spent the last two years as Senior Vice President and Chief…

More...
OpenPlus One $299 5.5-inch Full HD phone

OpenPlus One $299 5.5-inch Full HD phone

OnePlus is one of the few small companies that might disrupt the Android phone market, dominated by giant outfits like Samsung.…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 30 May 2007 10:08

Microsoft develops touchscreen computer

Written by
Image

Surface the size of a coffee table

 

Software company Microsoft has showed off its coffee-table shaped computer that responds to touch and to special bar codes attached to everyday objects.

Dubbed "Surface", the machines are a  Vista PC tucked inside a shiny black table base, topped with a 30-inch touchscreen in a clear acrylic frame.It mounts five cameras that can sense nearby objects beneath the screen.

Users can interact with the machine by touching or dragging their fingertips across it.Users can also pick up objects such as paintbrushes or place items tagged with special bar-code labels on top of it. It is also possible to touch the screen in several places at once.

It will cost between $5,000 and $10,000 per unit at the moment, but Microsoft hopes to create cheaper consumer versions in three to five years.Its current use seems to be as a display tool.

More here.

Last modified on Wednesday, 30 May 2007 10:29

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments