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Saturday, 03 January 2009 11:56

Sun reveals that yelling at disk drives causes high latency

Written by Fudzilla staff

Image

According to video experiment


It isn't
everyday that someone posts up a YouTube video demonstrating the effects of human vocal vibrations on disk drives.

Nevertheless, an engineer from the Sun Microsystems Fishworks lab proceeded to yell and scream at his high volume JBOD disk array and has given the rest of the world one straight answer to his findings: yelling at your computer isn't going to make it run any faster.

According to the performance analysis results in the video, the generated vocal vibrations caused a sharp spike in the number of I/O operations per disk and a noticeable latency increase on the overall workload.  In the end, however, we're still left wondering how this guy actually made the discovery, as he must have left off quite a bit of steam toward these drives.

Check out the video here.
Last modified on Monday, 05 January 2009 03:53

Fudzilla staff

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