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Wednesday, 12 August 2009 12:53

Texas court orders Microsoft to stop selling Word

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Permanent injunction


A Texas court has told Microsoft to stop selling Word, after concluding the popular software package infringes a patent owned by a Canadian company.

Toronto-based company i4i sued Redmond over the issue five years ago, arguing that Word violated its 1998 patent for a document system with automated formating code embedding.

A jury in Texas found Microsoft had infringed i4i's patents and ordered it to pay $200 million in damages. However, on Tuesday judge Leonard Davis of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas issued a permanent injunction prohibiting Microsoft from selling Word or any product that uses the disputed technology in the United States.

Microsoft was also ordered to pay an additional $40 million for willful infringement, and $37 in interest. Microsoft has 60 days to comply with the injunction.

More here.

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