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Thursday, 16 August 2007 11:10

Mobile phone blocking spray is snake oil

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Clarins in hot water over advertising

 

French cosmetics firm Clarins has been slammed by the British Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) over its ads for a mobile phone radiation blocking spray.

The company claimed that its Expertise 3P spray can prevent skin damage by blocking harmful electromagnetic radiation from modern electronics.

However the ASA says those claims have no reasonable scientific basis and took issue with a national magazine and newspaper ad that linked EM radiation and accelerated aging. The ASA said the ad was an “undue appeal to consumers fear of the harm.”

Clarins sent studies to the ASA to back its claims. But the ASA concluded that those weren’t representative of the “typical consumer experience” as people don't hold phones for hours on end.

The ASA told Clarins here claim that electromagnetic waves can damage or age skin unless it had
“robust scientific evidence”.

Last modified on Thursday, 16 August 2007 11:21

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