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Monday, 02 July 2007 08:59

No Desktop Penryn 45 nm this year

Written by Fuad Abazovic


Image

But Intel can change its mind


We had a chance to spend some time with Intel latest roadmap and the current one doesn’t indicate that Intel plans to launch Yorkfield or any other desktop Quad core at 45 nanometre this year.


Intel is well known for changing its plans month by month so this can change, but according to the latest roadmap Intel plans to release the QX6850 Quad core at FSB 1333 and to stick with this 65 nanometre 3GHz processor till the end of the year.

There were two separate rumors that indicated that Intel might push a 3.33GHz 45 nm Quad core in 2007, but according to Intel’s roadmap this is not the case, at least not now.


Intel should be able to release at least some 45 nanometre processors for the desktop market, but the current plans for 45 nanometre is to introduce the Harpertown for servers first and then to launch the 45 nanometre Yorkfield for the desktop market. We wonder what the actual difference is between Harpertown and Yorkfield, as we believe that this can be different codenames for the same chip.

Last modified on Monday, 02 July 2007 09:07
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