Featured Articles

Apple iPad Air 2 costs $275 to build

Apple iPad Air 2 costs $275 to build

IHS has told Recode that the Apple iPad Air 2 16GB Wifi costs only $275 to build -- not bad…

More...
LG sells 16.8 million smartphones in Q3 14

LG sells 16.8 million smartphones in Q3 14

As Samsung is losing market share, another Korean company, which many had written off, is gaining.

More...
LG G Watch R EU price set at €299

LG G Watch R EU price set at €299

LG G Watch R is probably the best looking Android Wear device on the market and many have been waiting for…

More...
Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia recently released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture, with exceptional performance-per-watt. The Geforce GTX 970…

More...
Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 30 July 2007 08:36

Intel counter-charges European Commission

Written by David Stellmack

Image

Intel strikes back


Intel has struck
back at the European Commission’s antitrust regulator, claiming that the charges brought against Intel contain significant misunderstandings made by the EC. Last week we reported that the European Commission had sent Intel a Statement of Objections, containing allegations that Intel tried to use its market share to muscle its rival, Advanced Micro Devices, out of the processor business.

If the charges in the Statement of Objections are found to be valid, Intel could face significant fines and penalties on an annual basis. Intel claims that the European Commission did not understand Intel’s pricing and manufacturing costs methods, causing the EC to make some assumptions that were incorrect. Intel also claims that it will be working with the EC to assist the Commission in better understanding and interpreting those methods.

The Intel case is a keystone in the European Commission’s test of its authority and persuasiveness over the European Union courts. Regulators and businesses alike are awaiting an important EU court ruling on September 17th in which Microsoft has challenged a 2004 landmark decision of the Commission where the Commission found that Microsoft had violated antitrust laws. 

Stay tuned on this one.

Last modified on Monday, 30 July 2007 10:16
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments