Error
  • JUser::_load: Unable to load user with id: 67

Featured Articles

Intel refreshes CPU roadmap

Intel refreshes CPU roadmap

Intel has revealed an update to its CPU roadmap and some things have changed in 2015 and beyond. Let’s start with the…

More...
Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

We broke the news of Nvidia's ambitious gaming tablet plans back in May and now the Shield tablet got a bit…

More...
Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia has announced its first Android tablet and when we say Nokia, we don’t mean Microsoft. The Nokia N1 was designed…

More...
Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell is better known for its storage controllers, but the company doesn’t want to give up on the smartphone and…

More...
Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia recently released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture, with exceptional performance-per-watt. The Geforce GTX 970…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 07 November 2007 11:23

Fan film favorite killed by Games Workshop

Written by

Image

End of project


Games Workshop
has killed off one of the most ambitious fan films ever made. Damnatus was made by German fans of the Warhammer 40,000 game, cost more than 10,000 euros and took months to film, and scenes were shown online to drum up support. It ran 110 minutes and had loads of high-tech special effects, but Huan Vu, Director and Producer of the film, said Damnatus' creators have now given up trying to get the film in front of an audience.

But Games Workshop, which created Warhammer 40,000, has refused to give permission for the film to be shown. A Games Workshop spokesman said that to lose control of Warhammer or Warhammer 40,000 was simply unthinkable. Filming on Damnatus continued after Games Workshop had asked Mr. Vu and his colleagues to stop due to a misunderstanding.

The BBC quotes Dr. Guido Westkamp, a lecturer on intellectual property law at the University of London, who said copyright cases are always tricky to resolve and this is made more difficult by the technology involved.

More here.
Last modified on Thursday, 08 November 2007 04:58
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments