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Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 03 October 2007 11:17

ASUS Blitz Extreme Dissected - 4 Layout, overview

Written by Eliot Kucharik

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Review:
Extreme at its best



Layout:
ASUS did a marvelous job with the layout, it is nearly perfect. The only complaint is the location of the CPU-power-connector, which is too close to the socket and thus will create problems installing huge CPU-coolers. ASUS also removed the heatpipe alongside the memory banks, which will help make replacing the CPU-cooler easier. The significant difference compared to the Deluxe series are the two connectors on the Northbridge-cooler for watercooling-systems.

The heatpipe keeps the temperatures at bay; at least in normal conditions you won't have troubles keeping the board stable.

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The VRM is an analog 8-phase design, compared to the Deluxe series ASUS enhanced the design, which yields lower power-consumption.

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The memory slots are placed in such way you can replace memory, even with large PCIe graphic-cards installed; a good change compared to the Deluxe series.

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Between the PCIe x16 slots you see the IDT PCIe switch chip. This neat chip splits one PCIe x16 port to two PCIe x8 ports. The downside is the slavery slot is only PCIe 1.0a compliant, so if you plan to buy PCIe 2.0 graphic cards, you are out of luck: they will not be detected, or even worse they may be fried when you insert such a card.
A welcomed addition are the power-on switch and cmos-clear switch below the bottom PCI slot. The cmos-clear switch isn't needed, because the BIOS can re-boot after failed overclocked attempts.

(Page 4 of 11)
Last modified on Monday, 22 October 2007 20:23
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