Featured Articles

Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

We broke the news of Nvidia's ambitious gaming tablet plans back in May and now the Shield tablet got a bit…

More...
Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia has announced its first Android tablet and when we say Nokia, we don’t mean Microsoft. The Nokia N1 was designed…

More...
Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell is better known for its storage controllers, but the company doesn’t want to give up on the smartphone and…

More...
TSMC 16nm FinFET Plus in risk production

TSMC 16nm FinFET Plus in risk production

TSMC’s next generation 16nm process has reached an important milestone – 16nm FinFET Plus (16FF+) is now in risk production.

More...
Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia recently released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture, with exceptional performance-per-watt. The Geforce GTX 970…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 16 June 2010 13:13

HTC EVO 4G can be overclocked

Written by Nick Farell
ImageImage

Performance boost of 30 percent

One of the world's fastest smart phones, the HTC EVO can be overclocked so it can go 30 per cent faster. Wired has been reporting how the HTC Evo’s 1-GHz processor has been overclocked by an Android developer at the xda-developers forum to run at 1.267 GHz.

Michael Huang, who posted the hack under the nickname ‘coolbho3000?, says he’ll try and push the processor to do even more. He told Wired that it required a bit of work on the kernel that ran the phone to overclock it so it is not for the faint hearted.

The Evo, available exclusively on Sprint, has a huge 4.3-inch touchscreen, a 1-GHz Snapdragon processor, a front-facing 1.3-megapixel camera for video conferencing and a 8-megapixel camera for shooting photos and videos. It costs $200 with a two-year contract so this is not for the faint of heart.

Huang tried to overclock the Google Nexus One, which has the same 1-GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon processor as the HTC, but that hack pushed the speed of the processor to only about 1.1 GHz and was not worth the effort.

The hack involves using a rooted phone. You get an update.zip file to apply to that phone. Huang packaged the special overclocked kernel into the file using an Android app called SetCPU available in the Android Market to adjust the overclock.

The downside is that the sensors and camera on the phone do not currently work with the hack and the phone’s battery life also suffers.

Last modified on Sunday, 20 June 2010 17:03
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments