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Wednesday, 23 June 2010 11:36

Intel and FTC try to settle anti-trust case

Written by Nick Farell


Has a month to make up its mind
Intel says it has a month to make up its mind on a settlement dumped on it by the FTC.

Intel has been been accused of strong-arming clients into buying its computer chips. It announced that it has until July 22 to "review and discuss a
proposed" settlement. The chip maker said it would not comment further because the terms of the proposed consent order were confidential.

If the two parties do not reach an agreement by that date, the case could go before court in September. If the judge rules against Intel, the company could be forced to change
the way it prices its products and could be ordered to share intellectual property with competitors.

The FTC filed charges against Intel last December saying that the outfit had "engaged in a deliberate campaign to hamstring competitive threats
to its monopoly." Intel had been "running roughshod over the principles of fair play and the laws protecting competition on the merits," an FCC spokesman said. Intel paid $1.25 billion to AMD last year to settle antitrust claims.

Nick Farell

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+5 #1 blandead 2010-06-23 17:00
this is why everyone should support the underdog, AMD
 
 
+2 #2 D31337Antics 2010-06-23 21:21
I think intel is so big now that they have forgotten that if you make a good product people will buy it...
 

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