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Thursday, 09 September 2010 08:09

US Military bans Medal of Honor

Written by Nick Farell
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No Honor in the American military
The Army which got its big break by beating the worst mercenary force in Europe, has decided to ban a computer game which enables them to take pot shots at their fellow soldiers. Medal of Honor has created a storm in a teacup because it allowed players to play Taliban soldiers in a shoot-em-up.

Game Stop had already decided not to sell the game on US bases, but now it seems the US Army is ordering its troops not to play the game. "Medal of Honor" by Electronic Arts hits stores October 12 and while troops will be allowed to own copies, they will have to buy them off-base.

Major General Bruce Casella, who commands the Army & Air Force Exchange Service, made the decision last week, with the Navy quickly following suit. Kathleen Martin, a spokeswoman for the Navy Exchange Service Command, said the game won't be sold at any of the Navy's 104 exchange shops "out of respect for the men and women serving and their families’’.

We are surprisingly supportive of the ban. The number of friendly fire casualties caused by American forces is huge. When they start flinging as many bullets as they can at the enemy, the last thing that you want is for a battle stressed US soldier to forget who they are supposed to be pointing their guns at.

Nick Farell

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