Featured Articles

Nvidia Shield 2 shows up in AnTuTu

Nvidia Shield 2 shows up in AnTuTu

Nvidia’s original Shield console launched last summer to mixed reviews. It went on sale in the US and so far Nvidia…

More...
AMD CSO John Byrne talks ARM

AMD CSO John Byrne talks ARM

We had a chance to talk about AMD’s upcoming products with John Byrne, Chief Sales Officer, AMD. We covered a number…

More...
AMD Chief Sales Officer thinks GPU leadership is critical

AMD Chief Sales Officer thinks GPU leadership is critical

We had a chance to talk to John Byrne who spent the last two years as Senior Vice President and Chief…

More...
OpenPlus One $299 5.5-inch Full HD phone

OpenPlus One $299 5.5-inch Full HD phone

OnePlus is one of the few small companies that might disrupt the Android phone market, dominated by giant outfits like Samsung.…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 27 September 2010 13:31

Air Force says to leave GPS alone

Written by Nick Farell


“Works great”
A government report which is worried about the future reliability of the Global Positioning System satellite network is "overly pessimistic," Air Force commanders claim.

The Government Accountability Office, the investigative arm of Congress, said the latest GPS satellite was launched almost 3 1/2 years behind schedule, and further delays could leave the system with fewer than the 24 orbiting satellites it needs as older models wear out.

But Col. David Buckman of the Air Force Space Command at Peterson Air Force Base, Colo., said the report's facts were correct, but drew pessimistic conclusions. Satellites currently in the design or construction phase are on schedule and the Air Force has 31 healthy, operational satellites in orbit.

If the numbers of satellites drop below 24 most users, including some military applications, wouldn't be affected.

Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

Comments  

 
+2 #1 canerpense 2010-09-27 14:51
Differential-GPS (DGPS) won't be affected easily, although A-GPS and many other widely used GPSs will be affected if the number of satellites drop below 18+6.
 
 
0 #2 Reavenk 2010-09-27 15:30
Why is 24 such a magical number?
 
 
+3 #3 semitope 2010-09-27 16:45
What i want to know is what happens to the ones that "wear out" DO they just stay up there in orbit as space junk?
 
 
-2 #4 Null 2010-09-27 17:45
Quoting Reavenk:
Why is 24 such a magical number?



This is due to a requirement of a GPS satellite orbiting in each timezone. With 24 timezones in the world, you end up with 24 satellites.
 
 
+2 #5 Null 2010-09-27 17:48
Quoting semitope:
What i want to know is what happens to the ones that "wear out" DO they just stay up there in orbit as space junk?


When they are decommissioned, satellites are placed in a disposal orbit that is ~300 miles higher than the active constellation.

In other words...space junk. ;-)
 
 
+12 #6 canerpense 2010-09-27 18:04
Quoting Null:
Quoting Reavenk:
Why is 24 such a magical number?



This is due to a requirement of a GPS satellite orbiting in each timezone. With 24 timezones in the world, you end up with 24 satellites.


Um i think your information is wrong. There are 6 orbits for 24 satellites and there are 4 for each orbit in order to provide "continuous availability".

It has nothing to do with time zones.

http://www.kowoma.de/en/gps/orbits.htm
 

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments