Featured Articles

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

Research firm IHS got hold of Samsung’s new flagship smartphone and took it apart to the last bolt to figure out…

More...
Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Samsung’s Galaxy S5 has finally gone on sale and it can be yours for €699, which is quite a lot of…

More...
Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel has added a load of Haswell refresh parts to its official price list and there really aren’t any surprises to…

More...
Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

During his appearance at PAX East panel and confirmed on Twitter, Titanfall developer Respawn confirmed that the first DLC pack for…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 27 September 2010 13:31

Air Force says to leave GPS alone

Written by Nick Farell


“Works great”
A government report which is worried about the future reliability of the Global Positioning System satellite network is "overly pessimistic," Air Force commanders claim.

The Government Accountability Office, the investigative arm of Congress, said the latest GPS satellite was launched almost 3 1/2 years behind schedule, and further delays could leave the system with fewer than the 24 orbiting satellites it needs as older models wear out.

But Col. David Buckman of the Air Force Space Command at Peterson Air Force Base, Colo., said the report's facts were correct, but drew pessimistic conclusions. Satellites currently in the design or construction phase are on schedule and the Air Force has 31 healthy, operational satellites in orbit.

If the numbers of satellites drop below 24 most users, including some military applications, wouldn't be affected.

Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

Comments  

 
+2 #1 canerpense 2010-09-27 14:51
Differential-GPS (DGPS) won't be affected easily, although A-GPS and many other widely used GPSs will be affected if the number of satellites drop below 18+6.
 
 
0 #2 Reavenk 2010-09-27 15:30
Why is 24 such a magical number?
 
 
+3 #3 semitope 2010-09-27 16:45
What i want to know is what happens to the ones that "wear out" DO they just stay up there in orbit as space junk?
 
 
-2 #4 Null 2010-09-27 17:45
Quoting Reavenk:
Why is 24 such a magical number?



This is due to a requirement of a GPS satellite orbiting in each timezone. With 24 timezones in the world, you end up with 24 satellites.
 
 
+2 #5 Null 2010-09-27 17:48
Quoting semitope:
What i want to know is what happens to the ones that "wear out" DO they just stay up there in orbit as space junk?


When they are decommissioned, satellites are placed in a disposal orbit that is ~300 miles higher than the active constellation.

In other words...space junk. ;-)
 
 
+12 #6 canerpense 2010-09-27 18:04
Quoting Null:
Quoting Reavenk:
Why is 24 such a magical number?



This is due to a requirement of a GPS satellite orbiting in each timezone. With 24 timezones in the world, you end up with 24 satellites.


Um i think your information is wrong. There are 6 orbits for 24 satellites and there are 4 for each orbit in order to provide "continuous availability".

It has nothing to do with time zones.

http://www.kowoma.de/en/gps/orbits.htm
 

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments