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Wednesday, 29 September 2010 09:49

New supercomputer from Fujitsu

Written by Nick Farell


K can do 10 petaflops
Fujitsu has begun building a next-generation supercomputer in a Kobe research lab.

Dubbed the "K," the computer is expected to have a 10-petaflop processing speed, performing 10 quadrillion calculations in a second. If it manages this speed it will be the fastest computer in the world and can probably deduce the existence of Taramasalata and predict the ramifications of Craig David before it is even switched on in 2012.

It is being produced through a public-private effort and involves 800 computer racks. It will be used by universities and corporations for R&D in such fields as pharmaceutical development and climate trend analyses. It is uncertain whether the K will actually be the fastest in the world by the time it is ready to be used. IBM  has said it will complete a supercomputer exceeding 10 petaflops in late 2011.

Nick Farell

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