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Wednesday, 06 October 2010 12:27

Intel's 25nm SSDs detailed

Written by Slobodan Simic
intel_logo_new

The 3rd generation


Intel has been working on its third generation of solid state drives for quite some time and as you all probably know, these will be based on 25nm NAND MLC chips and should provide decent write/read performance boost when compared to the previous generation. Anandtech managed to get some details regarding these upcoming SSDs and it will be quite interesting to see them compared to the competition once these show up in retail.

The G3 series of Intel SSDs will follow similar naming scheme as the previous generation so you can expect the X25-M as a part of the consumer line and X25-E G3 as a part of the enterprise line. The X25-M will be available as a 1.8-inch and 2.5-inch version and the only difference is the maximum capacity as the 1.8-inch will top out at 300GB while the 2.5-inch will be available in capacities of up to 600GB. The X25-E will top out at 400GB.

The first, and most noticable difference is the presence of the off-controller DRAM. Intel claims that it managed to include a "power safe write cache" which means that it simply might end up with a large external DRAM. The second big feature on the 3rd-gen Intel SSD line is the AES-128 encryption support.

The X25-M is rated at 250MB/s for read and 170MB/s for write while the 4K performance ends up at 40,000 IOPS for write and 50,000 IOPS for read. The X25-E, codename Lyndonville, on the other hand uses 25nm eMLC NAND and as noted, will be available in 100, 200 and 400GB capacities. This one is rated at 250MB/s for read and 200MB/s for write, so a bit higher than the consumer part. It has 4k performance of 50K IOPS for read and 5K IOPS for write.

The drives should should reach mass availability sometime in Q4 2010 to Q1 2011 timeframe so we are pretty sure that it will be interesting to see them compared to the rest of the competition.

You can find the full report over at Anandtech.com.
Last modified on Wednesday, 06 October 2010 12:34
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Comments  

 
+11 #1 Di Leonardo 2010-10-06 14:04
i still don't own a first generation ssd. Don't leave me behind.
 
 
+5 #2 shandman 2010-10-06 14:27
Can anyone tell me how the reported new Intell SSD speeds compare to the current competition?

Also, how will "power safe write cache" help?
 
 
+5 #3 gangsta072 2010-10-06 14:30
Just out of curiosity the x25m has w IOP's of 40k and the x25e has w IOP's of 4k ???

BTW the Article is full of grammar errors..
 
 
-8 #4 gangsta072 2010-10-06 14:33
Quoting shandman:
Can anyone tell me how the reported new Intell SSD speeds compare to the current competition?

Also, how will "power safe write cache" help?


Simple Intel ssd's you can defrag while all the others you can not (maybe samsung ssd ca do so too) ; 2nd that power safe write cache may be for in case of power loss the data in the write cache should still be in tact
 
 
+5 #5 Bl0bb3r 2010-10-06 16:41
@shandman, previous intel SSD's didn't have a buffer cache like other SSD's do, or even HDD, those 32 or 64 MB of memory. The reason for that was an (idiotic) argument that if power-loss would happen the data that was in the cache would not make it to the flash memory for static storage and would be lost since the cache is volatile/dynamic, cant's hold data unless there's current going through it. As a solution, they would use other static cells as buffers. Well, now they changed that, use a ram chip as buffer and a capacitor that charges current and delivers it even at power loss, enough to write safe what's in the cache the static flash memory.
 
 
+5 #6 Bl0bb3r 2010-10-06 16:46
@gangsta072, you cannot defragmentate an SSD, there's no point to it, all you can do is reset the cells to their clean state.
 
 
+6 #7 Haberlandt 2010-10-06 17:41
Quoting Bl0bb3r:
@gangsta072, you cannot defragmentate an SSD, there's no point to it, all you can do is reset the cells to their clean state.
I think you can but is useless since there is no performance gain.
 
 
+5 #8 Bl0bb3r 2010-10-06 18:31
I mean defragging = putting each cluster of a (large) file consecutively. On an SSD you simply can't because the controller will scatter the pieces all over the available space based on the wear level of each block (>= 256k cells), making the LBA (logical address) not match the equivalent of CHS (physical address) for SSD's.
 
 
+1 #9 Nerdmaster 2010-10-06 21:04
Quote:
i still don't own a first generation ssd. Don't leave me behind.


Don't leave me too!

Damn SSDs are too expensive. I prefer having a high end graphic card than a ssd...
 
 
+1 #10 Marburg_U 2010-10-06 21:50
Nice, but i want 80gb x25-v.
 

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