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Tuesday, 26 October 2010 08:57

Kinect does not spy on you

Written by David Stellmack
microsoft

It actually isn’t always looking at you
The concept of the instant-on feature of Kinect that recognizes you after you wave at it is not an always-on type of spy camera. Some have expressed fears about the Kinect camera being always-on and connected to the Internet; but actually these fears appear to be groundless.

Despite what Kinect users might think, the camera is activated by an infrared pickup that detects movement, so it isn’t always looking or searching for an image. It only activates when sufficient movement occurs to turn it on; and images cannot be broadcast over the Internet without a user’s permission. Currently, only the video chat application supports the sending of video to another user, at least according to our understanding.

Don’t look for Microsoft to create some sort of creepy spy program for Kinect; despite all of the science fiction stories that you may have read about, this just isn’t something that is on their agenda.

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Comments  

 
+10 #1 thematrix606 2010-10-26 09:20
"at least according to our understanding."

Wow. Shame on you! Reading the manual?

That's like asking a criminal for his word, and believing him.

I'm not saying they are criminals, or liars, but...that's the stupidest way to confirm something.
 
 
+6 #2 ghelyar 2010-10-26 17:15
3rd party software can probably still use the camera whenever it wants though.
 
 
+4 #3 thomasg 2010-10-26 18:40
If ANY program currently uses it, it wouldn't be very difficult for any hacker or other interested party to do it. They could probably even trick the device into thinking it detected movement and turning on.
 

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