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Monday, 22 November 2010 10:33

Globalfoundries to make 28nm Fusion chips

Written by Fuad Abazovic
globalfoundriesfusion
First High K metal gate
Amd has spilled the beans about its 28nm production. At its investor days event Chekib Akrout, Senior VP, Technology group at AMD told investors that they are using first high-K gate 28nm process, something that Globalfoundries do exclusively.

TSMC does last gate processes and Samsung doesn’t even have 28nm ready for late 2011, so it is out of the equation.

We asked around and industry sources have confirmed that Krishna and Wichita are going to be made in 28nm Globalfoundries first high-K gate process, that is scheduled to start the production in second part of 2011.

TSMC was the only choice for 40nm simply as Globalfoundries didn’t have any 40nm process. The reason is simple, AMD never planned a 40nm chip and on its roadmap it always had full node transitions from 45 nm to 32nm and 22nm in the future.

Since Globalfoundries need half-nodes in order to continue competition with TSMC, this is why you will continue to see these chips in the future.

Charlie has also pointed in the same direction and you can read his part here.

Last modified on Monday, 22 November 2010 10:49
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Comments  

 
+20 #1 thaad 2010-11-22 10:51
As usual, Radeon will lead the new technology... :D
 
 
+22 #2 CRoland 2010-11-22 10:59
Quote:
first high-K gate 28nm process



You mean gate-first high-k metal gate process.
 
 
-16 #3 Alexko 2010-11-22 11:09
Quoting CRoland:
Quote:
first high-K gate 28nm process



You mean gate-first high-k metal gate process.








Indeed, and by the same token, gate-last.
 
 
+5 #4 redisnidma 2010-11-23 02:30
What a relief. :-*
No more crappy TSMC processes from now on.
 
 
0 #5 JAB Creations 2010-11-23 03:27
Quoting redisnidma:
No more crappy TSMC processes from now on.


I might have missed tech news about other companies besides Nvidia that had problems with TSMC though unless someone could please provide linkage it's still my understanding that it was an issue exclusive to Nvidia chips. Don't take that as fanboyism though, I prefer competition in the free-market economy.
 
 
-1 #6 East17 2010-11-23 12:55
If Global Foundries are getting ready for a simple 28nm process. Why isn't AMD moving some of their "less complex" products from their 45nm line to the 28nm line before the 32nm full grown line comes online? Just to have something done ahead INTEl. Before INTEL get's to 22nm.
 

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