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Wednesday, 01 December 2010 14:21

Wireless outfits big Linux supporters

Written by Nick Farell


Can't get enough penguin
Wireless companies are flogging to adopt Linux, according to a report from the Linux Foundation said.

The report shows the role of traditional top contributors to Linux, such as Red Hat, Novell and IBM, is slightly decreasing, while companies with a strong mobile Linux focus are becoming increasingly important for the development of the platform.

Most of the situation is thanks to Google's free Linux-based Android platform, which has pushed the operating system into the mobile world. Top smartphone makers, other than Nokia and Apple, use Android in their flagship phones. However Nokia is likely to push entirely into the Linux verson MeeGo next year.

Intel has passed Novell and IBM to become the second largest contributor to Linux, while Nokia has risen to the No. 5 spot. More than 70 percent of contributions are from developers who are getting paid for their Linux development from corporations who hope to benefit from better software in their core business, the report said.

Nick Farell

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+9 #1 Wolfdale 2010-12-01 14:31
and at the end of the story,
for the home user it means linux is still a good alternative for windows,
and with this immense ammount of development done by several contributors,
it might at some point actually be a worthy competitor for microsoft (not saying it isnt now for the nerds(myself incl.))

but i can see it happening, bigger OEM providers like asus/lenovo/hp/msi selling linux based laptops at some point, it would most certainly save you the deal to pay for any software that has the MS tag
 
 
-13 #2 Jurassic1024 2010-12-01 15:15
Preinstalled Linux on Dell PC's was the number 1 request for a long time. Dell finally caved, then shortly after, stopped offering it preinstalled. Seems to me those requests were made by people already using Linux.

Numbers don't lie. Linux on the desktop accounts for 1% of all computers in the world. Keep it on servers, but leave the desktop to ones that have the experience (Mac, Windows). Windows and Mac are flawed enough. Bringing in a third wouldn't help anybody. Linux is far from plug and play for the average Joe. They have a hard enough time with Windows and Mac. Most people running Linux dual boot anyway. Not very convincing if you want to bring it into the game with the other two software giants.

Linux is free. You get what you pay for.
 
 
+1 #3 ghelyar 2010-12-01 17:14
Ironic title, as wireless support on Linux sucks (either due to licensing from the manufacturer i.e. can't put it in the kernel so have to go and find the "firmware" file yourself, or things like NetworkManager/WICD which I never found very reliable)

Combined with poor battery life and quirky suspend states, I use Linux for all of my wired desktop boxes but none of my notebooks at all.



Manufacturers selling Linux is unlikely to happen just because they save money on Windows by having exclusivity deals with Microsoft. If they don't put Windows on every machine, the cost of those sold with Windows will rise, making them less competitive.
 
 
+3 #4 thomasg 2010-12-01 17:49
Quoting Jurassic1024:
Numbers don't lie. Linux on the desktop accounts for 1% of all computers in the world. Keep it on servers, but leave the desktop to ones that have the experience (Mac, Windows).

Doesn't Mac account for about 1% of all computers in the world? That doesn't mean they shouldn't even bother, as competition fuels innovation. I personally use Windows, because I do a lot of group projects in Word, Powerpoint, etc. for college, but I think other OS's have their place as well.
 
 
+4 #5 Wolfdale 2010-12-01 20:17
Quoting Jurassic1024:
Linux is far from plug and play for the average Joe. They have a hard enough time with Windows and Mac. Most people running Linux dual boot anyway. Not very convincing if you want to bring it into the game with the other two software giants.


yes,
that would be the entire point..
if some OEM would start selling a laptop wich has a free complete office suit, a linux version, modified to work on that laptop flawlessly, and all the stuff you need, pdf readers etc..
there is no need for ppl to find out the wheel.. for the average user, this would work like a charm,
provided the OEM makes a good shell for their linux-product
 
 
+4 #6 Wolfdale 2010-12-01 20:17
Quoting ghelyar:
Manufacturers selling Linux is unlikely to happen just because they save money on Windows by having exclusivity deals with Microsoft. If they don't put Windows on every machine, the cost of those sold with Windows will rise, making them less competitive.


yeah, wich basically describes the definition of a monopoly,
wich microsoft has been sued for several times..

such killer-contracts are no reason NOT to do it, because both the oem and microsoft know its not gonna stand in a trial, as been proven before several times
 
 
+2 #7 Scorsese 2010-12-02 08:12
There are already enought linux based OS out there that meet the requirements you specified, lets take ubuntu for example. It has the Ubuntu software center where you can install basicly any software for a required task. You need an office suite?...no probls...Opne office has all the tools microsoft office offers, and all for free, not 500$ like a MS Office licence costs. Adobe reader is also available in Software center. Wine allows you to run several MS apps almost flawless, and the list goes on. As long as you dont have to use a specific aplication or game that is only developed for MS Windows, there is no reason why an average Joe couldn't use an user friendly version of linux like Ubuntu or Fedora. But then again, this is my personal opinion.
 
 
-1 #8 Naterm 2010-12-02 12:16
I don't know about the entire world, but MacOS accounts for roughly 10% of users in the United States. Linux isn't even 1%. It's a great embedded and server OS, it's not a very good desktop OS unless you're a serious user. It's a lot easier than it used to be, but it's still too hard for most idiots to figure out. They'll run out and buy Office 2010 and then wonder why it won't install.
 

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