Featured Articles

5th Generation Broadwell 14nm family comes in three lines

5th Generation Broadwell 14nm family comes in three lines

Intel's 5th Core processor family, codenamed Broadwell, will launch in three lines for the mobile segment. We are talking about upcoming…

More...
Broadwell Chromebooks coming in late Q1 2015

Broadwell Chromebooks coming in late Q1 2015

Google's Chromebook OS should be updating automatically every six weeks, but Intel doesn't come close with its hardware refresh schedule.

More...
New round of Nexus phone rumour kicks off

New round of Nexus phone rumour kicks off

Rumours involving upcoming Nexus devices are nothing uncommon, but this year there is a fair bit of confusion, especially on the…

More...
Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

As expected and reported earlier, Nvidia has now officially announced its newest Shield device, the new 8-inch Shield Tablet. While the…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 09 December 2010 11:58

Insecurity experts close to fixing the worst hack of all time

Written by Nick Farell
china-flag

The Internet will not belong to China again
Insecurity experts claim that they are close to sealing one of the worst flaws in Internet coding which effectively shunted all US traffic through China for half an hour. The incident which happened last year was thanks to a lack of security in the Internet's main routing protocol.

While a fix has been mooted for nearly a decade,  a fix should be rolled out in January. Beginning Jan. 1, Internet registries will add a layer of encryption to their operations so that ISPs and other network operators can verify that they have the authority to route traffic for a block of IP addresses or routing prefixes known as Autonomous System Numbers.

The fix, which has been dubbed Resource Public Key Infrastructure (RPKI), is not perfect and it needs adoption by all of the Internet registries as well as major ISPs before it can provide a significant amount of protection. Proponents of RPKI say it is a much-needed first step in improving the security of the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP), which is the core routing protocol of the Internet.

If widely adopted, should prevent ISPs from accidentally disrupting the flow of Internet traffic with erroneous routing information. The RPKI development effort was funded in part by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, probably as the US woke up to the fact that the status quo was insanity.

Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments