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Tuesday, 14 December 2010 11:02

Germans ask IBM to make them the world's fastest supercomputer

Written by Nick Farell
ibm

Must be very precise
Germany's Bavarian Academy of Science has contracted Biggish Blue to build a supercomputer that, when completed in 2012 will be the most powerful in the known world.

Dubbed the SuperMUC, the computer will be run by the Academy's Leibniz Supercomputing Centre in Garching, Germany. It will be available for European boffins who are probing the frontiers of medicine, astrophysics and anything else boffinish that needs a computer.

The MUC suffix is borrowed from the Munich airport code and Martin Jetter, chairman of the board of IBM Germany said that the German and European research community will get a push to be on the forefront of international competition.

The system will use 14,000 Intel Xeon processors which will be shoved into IBM System x iDataPlex servers and it should be able to reach speeds of 3 petaflops. We guess when the BBC reports it, it will say something like “a second of a machine at this speed can process the same amount as would take someone with a pocket calculator a trillion years.”

SuperMUC will use a new form of cooling that IBM developed, called Aquasar. It uses hot water to cool the processors, a design that should cut cooling electricity usage by 40 percent, the company claims.

Arndt Bode, chairman of the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre board of directors said that SuperMUC will provide previously unattainable energy efficiency. This approach will allow the industry to develop ever more powerful supercomputers while keeping energy use in check," said, in a statement.

Once built, the system should rank near the top of the twice-annually compiled Top500 list of world's most-powerful computers. The top of the list at the moment is the Chinese Tianhe-1A system benchmarked a performance of 2.67 petaflops.

By the time it is built, SuperMUC will have some new competition for the top spot. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are each building a 20 petaflop computer. Both are expected to be operational in 2012.


Last modified on Tuesday, 14 December 2010 11:07

Nick Farell

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+5 #1 oblivion 2010-12-14 11:38
Quote:
The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are each building a 20 petaflop computer. Both are expected to be operational in 2012.
:eek:
 
 
0 #2 Naterm 2010-12-14 11:47
Yeah, there is no way they'll have the fastest supercomputer in the world with 328,000 Xeon cores (assuming an 8-core Sandy Bridge Xeon). However, iDataplex boxes have the ability to mount GPUs, so they could definitely make it faster if they wanted to.

As is, it'll be slower than the mentioned new machines for ORNL and LLNL and probably slower than Blue Waters too. Not to mention anything the Chinese might slap together.
 
 
+9 #3 Peter Ong 2010-12-14 13:29
After 20 yrs, these supercomputers (regardless of how many physical cores) will be minimized to the size of a set top box ... again, and the history continues.
 
 
+1 #4 bene 2010-12-14 13:58
well, thats stupid...
im studying at TUM in Garching/Munich. And nobody said, it will be the fastest. You just made that up to get some sensation in that boring news. It will be one of the fastest, but for sure not the fastest. read that: http://portal.mytum.de/pressestelle/meldungen/NewsArticle_20101214_120604

Quote:
to make them the world's fastest supercomputer

Quote:
when completed in 2012 will be the most powerful in the known world.

Quote:
rank near the top of the twice-annually compiled Top500

Quote:
Oak Ridge National Laboratory are each building a 20 petaflop computer

some conflict in here? of course the first two are just wrong
 
 
+1 #5 Naterm 2010-12-14 14:01
That's assuming Moore's "Law" is sustained. It's looking increasingly unlikely that, although still far from decided, that this can be done with silicon. It's been said before, but this time it looks like Moore's Law could fail before too long.

There is graphene waiting in the wings, but when fabricating complex microprocessors from graphine could begin is anyone's guess. Hopefully no one brings up quantum computers. When someone brings up quantum computation in near-future time scales it just shows how little they actually know.
 
 
0 #6 GrumpyOldMan 2010-12-14 16:06
Graphene??

Gas deposition died 2 years ago (thank god). Light packet-quanta. That was supposed to replace silicon. Alas none of that matters right now.

I thought the Chinese had the fastest supercomputer? I also thought it was made from nvidia GPU's??

I need to know about cloud more. I think in theory, it can pull the physical resources of all computers hooked up to it. At any given time, there are probably like 100 million going in the US alone.

Look at the steam user charts in the millions too.

I could also be very wrong and/or suffering from symptoms of a mild stroke, making what I say......meaningless.

,
 
 
0 #7 DJDestiny 2010-12-14 21:32
Quoting GrumpyOldMan:
Graphene??

Gas deposition died 2 years ago (thank god). Light packet-quanta. That was supposed to replace silicon. Alas none of that matters right now.

I thought the Chinese had the fastest supercomputer? I also thought it was made from nvidia GPU's??

I need to know about cloud more. I think in theory, it can pull the physical resources of all computers hooked up to it. At any given time, there are probably like 100 million going in the US alone.

Look at the steam user charts in the millions too.

I could also be very wrong and/or suffering from symptoms of a mild stroke, making what I say......meaningless.

,


And i bet lots of heat to deal with .
 
 
+1 #8 Naterm 2010-12-15 03:20
Are you seriously suggesting 'the cloud' could replace supercomputers? Because if you are, you should go back and think some more.

The biggest bottlenecks on supercomputers aren't lack of processing power, it's the interconnect bandwidth and particularly latency. For top performance they need microsecond level latency. What you're talking about has already been done, it's called grid computing. Outside of distributed computing projects it's not used very often.
 

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