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Wednesday, 05 January 2011 10:39

Man used software glitch to beat the bank

Written by Nick Farell
y_money

Earned $500,000 from a casino
A bloke who discovered a software glitch in a one armed bandit machine and used it to clean up in a  a western Pennsylvania casino has been arrested by the untouchables. Andre Nestor, 39, was arrested this week after he arrived at the Washington County Courthouse for jury selection.

He was charged with 650 counts of theft, criminal conspiracy, computer trespassing and other charges involving the Meadows Racetrack and Casino. The FBI claims that Nestor and two others caused a high-bet slot machine at the casino to generate false jackpots in 2009 all up Nestor is believed to have taken home about $1 million at casinos.

However Nester claims that he is being arrested for for winning on a slot machine,". He said that the surveillance tapes will show that he pressed buttons on the machine on the casino and won. The FBI will probably claim that he discovered that certain button combinations caused the machine to react in a particular way. It will be interesting to see how the coppers prove that is illegal as he did not actually break into the machines software.

The two men accused in the Washington County case with Nestor have pleaded guilty. Kerry Laverde, 51, pleaded guilty to three counts of receiving stolen property. Patrick Loushil, 42, had previously pleaded guilty in the case and had been expected to testify against Nestor at his Pennsylvania trial.


Nick Farell

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Comments  

 
+47 #1 Warhead 2011-01-05 10:49
Typical, these casinos never accept when customers start earning lots of money. Even if there is a glitch, he's done nothing wrong.

It's like in Fallout New Vegas...you start earning money and they kick you out of the place!
 
 
+37 #2 yourma2000 2011-01-05 10:57
if there's a glitch then that's the casinos fault, the games are presented as they are, glitches are part of the games structure in which the casino has presented it
 
 
+35 #3 Wolfesteinabhi 2011-01-05 11:21
supposedly this doesnt happen when you loose a lot of money to casino...its just expected!!! ..no one can sue them ..coz they are money eating gods!?!?
 
 
+2 #4 thetruth 2011-01-05 15:40
This article makes them sound so innocent. A quick google search...

Quote:
The con involved Mr. Nestor passing himself off as a “high roller” who would then enter the casino along with partner in crime and former Swissvale police officer Kerry Laverde, who would flash his police badge and claim to be Nestor’s bodyguard.

Armed with the knowledge of an internal glitch, Nestor would head to the high-bet slot machines and use his extra sway as a “high roller” to get a member of staff to alter “soft” options on the slots, such as volume and screen brightness, and most importantly to unlock the double-up feature.


I don't understand the language, but it sounds dodgy.
 
 
+4 #5 roberto.tomas 2011-01-05 16:25
Quoting thetruth:
This article makes them sound so innocent. ...

I don't understand the language, but it sounds dodgy.


Just because of the bad press they should have gone out of their way to drop charges. The charges don't seem to match the crime anyway, and the crime apparently doesn't match the reporting of it -- with everything variable, I guess everyone should walk away scott-free :P

If they didn't do it under false pretenses (flashing a badge is impersonating a police officer, it would be if they had gone on to assault someone instead, and I'm amazed that isn't the charge) this would be a no-brainer.
 
 
+10 #6 EVOXSNES 2011-01-05 19:10
Get a good lawyer and fight it.. you got enough money ffs
 
 
+12 #7 Nerdmaster 2011-01-05 23:07
I bet the casino would never complain if that person lost 500.000$
I personaly congratulate him. 8)
 
 
+7 #8 Nerdmaster 2011-01-05 23:10
Quote:
The FBI will probably claim that he discovered that certain button combinations caused the machine to react in a particular way.

Right...
This sounds like this: If I fart and an earthquake happens I will be considered responsible. Those guys at FBI are so brilliant! :D
 

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