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Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 24 January 2011 09:21

AMD working on new multi-GPU technology

Written by Slobodan Simic
fusion

For Fusion Llano's

After getting praise for its Fusion Zacate APU, it looks like AMD will switch its attention to Llano APUs that are aimed at mainstream desktop, business and AIO PC markets. The Llano is meant to be a direct competition to Intel's Core i5 and Core i3 CPUs and will feature a technology similar to the Hybrid CrossFireX that will pair up the GPU integrated in the Fusion APU with a discrete AMD Radeon card, including the HD 6000 series.

As you probably already know, The Llano APU is a part of AMD's Lynx platform and features dual core CPU paired up with a DirectX 11 GPU. The new multi-GPU technology will pair up the existing GPU with a discrete card which should provide additional performance boost and, of course, provide a much better display connectivity.

Donanimhaber managed to get their hands on on a couple of slides that show a performance improvement of a Llano APU with and without the additional discrete card and the it is quite impressive. We are quite sure that AMD will come up with something similar to Nvidia Optimus and the discrete GPU will be able to power down or up depending on the load.

Of course, we are still to see AMD's Lynx platform in action but we quite sure that more details will show up as we get closer to the launch date.

You can find more here.

amd_llanoperf_1
Last modified on Monday, 24 January 2011 10:00
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Comments  

 
-13 #1 Shadow187 2011-01-24 12:07
With the way AMD is going...gamers/value-hunters are going to recognize them and PC Extremists/PC-related corporations will recognize Intel.

What's bigger? The gaming populace, or the people that want the absolute best?

[Please note I'm speaking of Processing Performance vs Graphics Performance]
 
 
+15 #2 MrScary 2011-01-24 13:19
Liano is best in both computing and way more over graphic aspect so i dont get your post. All on a single chip, thats incredible.

And even more, corporations will go for the best price at better results, less power usage, and Fusion wins on all of them.

And we will see when Buldozer comes out.
 
 
+9 #3 Naterm 2011-01-24 13:37
Sorry, but "PC-related corportations" as you put it, sounds like a much bigger market than the PC gaming populace, which is quite small.

AMD needs to get a decent number of server design wins with Bulldozer. I expect they will, I wouldn't think there would be a repeat of the Opteron 6100/4100 fiasco. On the other hand, I don't seem them getting nearly as many designs as intel will get with it's combination of Westmere-EX (just slots into current Nehalem-EX designs) and Sandy Bridge-EP.
 
 
+2 #4 asianbullet 2011-01-24 15:41
AMD certainly moving in the right direction with introducing "co-op" between te APU & discrete GPU. However, the slide above I'm quite dissapointed in the comparison of parts AMD has chosen. The last config is inconsistant, as the previous configs uses the Radeon 5550 as the discrete GPU, whereass the last config uses the 'Turks' GPU which is the Radoen 6670. So there's obviously going to be an advantage there. I'm guessing if they're going with the previous incarnation on Hybrid Crossfire X. Then only certain discrete GPU's will be compatible with the new APU's. Now that would be very disapointing to any business looking to upgrade to APU but wanting to keeo their existing discrete GPU.
 
 
+2 #5 thomasg 2011-01-24 19:30
The reason they only made certain GPU's compatible is that if you pair it with a discrete GPU that is much faster than the integrated one, it's going to hold back the discrete GPU. If you ran a 6900 series card with the 6310 in the APU, it would be slower than just using the discrete graphics because the 6950/70 would always be waiting on the 6310 to rende the other frame or the othe half of that frame. If you have, say, a 5450, it would probably be faster at AFR between it and the 6310 core than if it rendered eveything by itself. You can only be twice as fast as your slowest chip in a dual GPU setup. Quoting asianbullet:
...
 
 
+3 #6 Bl0bb3r 2011-01-24 19:31
@asianbullet, probably Llano's GPU will be on the level of Redwood?

@Simic, "We are quite sure that AMD will come up with something similar to Nvidia Optimus and the discrete GPU will be able to power down or up depending on the load."

I'm quite sure you shouldn't be sure, and that AMD already has its Optimus, for some time now and that's not the issue here. Probably they need something better to Crossfire, something that scales well through the bus itself in the absence of a Crossfire connector.
 
 
-2 #7 Pyronick 2011-01-24 20:43
Quoting Bl0bb3r:
@asianbullet, probably Llano's GPU will be on the level of Redwood?

@Simic, "We are quite sure that AMD will come up with something similar to Nvidia Optimus and the discrete GPU will be able to power down or up depending on the load."

I'm quite sure you shouldn't be sure, and that AMD already has its Optimus, for some time now and that's not the issue here. Probably they need something better to Crossfire, something that scales well through the bus itself in the absence of a Crossfire connector.
AMD needs to implement the PCI Express controller in the APU-SOC.

Then design a new interface which is signal compatible with PCI Express, but also transfers specific CrossFire data.
 
 
+2 #8 Bl0bb3r 2011-01-24 20:53
Quoting Pyronick:
AMD needs to implement the PCI Express controller in the APU-SOC.



That is on... most of NB's logic moved to the uncore. Hudson is but an SB. Same thing on Sandy.


Quoting Pyronick:
Then design a new interface which is signal compatible with PCI Express, but also transfers specific CrossFire data.



Something like this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CrossFire#Second-generation_.28Software_CrossFire.29 ? Probably and improved variant...
 
 
+1 #9 asianbullet 2011-01-25 00:42
THOMASG - I fully take your point & am aware of that. But I am hoping that they would take another set of graphical processes aside from the rendering of frames, to implement "cross talk" between the APU & the discrete GPU. It would be ideal if the APU graphical side could take care of say 'physics' whilst the discrete GPU can take care of the rendering. Although there might be a bottle-neck in the sense that the computational CPU side of the APU might not be able to keep up.
 
 
-2 #10 Sinister213 2011-01-25 09:10
amd will never be within pissing distance of intel.
 

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