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Friday, 18 February 2011 00:00

Club 3D CSP-X1000CB (1000W) PSU tested - 4. Testing

Written by Sanjin Rados
club_3d_1000W_PSU_thumb

Preview: Take the power back

Club 3D CSP-X1000CB is a 1000W power supply, classified on Club 3D web portal as triple-VGA ready. To be honest, 1000W is quite a lot but today’s high-end hardware is not quite easy on power bills either. For instance, Nvidia recommends a 1200W or higher for a tri-way SLI setup with GTX 580 cards. If you’re looking to build a tri-way SLI configuration, you might want to check the power requirements here

CSP-X1000CB is 80 Plus Bronze certified, which means that it has to churn out 82%, 85% and 82% efficiency for respective workloads of 20%, 50% and 100%. Since we down have the kind of equipment to test for that kind of efficiency, we’ll have to go with practical application tests. For the same reason, we called this a preview rather than a review, as you'll have to find detailed measurements elsewhere.

Two AMD HD 6970 graphics cards in CrossFire will help us put enough load on Club 3D CSP-X1000CB, so that we can test for fan loudness and stability of entire rig.

Fan Noise

Club 3D CSP-X1000CB’s fan was pretty quiet in idle mode. We could hear the fan but it’s not particularly noticeable.

The following three photos show Club 3D’s CSP-X1000CB in BitFenix Colossus case. The fan is on the bottom but aimed upwards in order to draw in fresh air.

mounted-psu

psu-inside-3

mounted-psu1

CSP-X1000CB uses a 135mm fan that turned out to be quiet even under high loads. Truth be told, if you're looking to build a three way graphics card setup, the PSU fan will be the least of your noise troubles.

Stability and Efficiency

Our test rig ran entirely stable during our testing. Our tests revealed that Club 3D CSP-X1000CB is somewhere in line with CoolerMaster's Silent Pro 1000W. Note however that these kinds of tests require more expensive equipment, and thus the differences might be down to the imprecision of our measurement device. Having said that, you can see that a high end rig with two HD 6970 cards and not many additional devices (SSD and DVD drive only) consumes about 700W while playing Metro 2033 at 2560x1600. It makes it pretty clear that three HD 6970 or three GTX 580 will benefit from an even stronger PSU.

Testbed

Motherboard: EVGA 4xSLI
CPU: Core i7 965 XE (Intel EIST and Vdrop enabled)
Memory: 6GB Corsair Dominator 12800 7-7-7-24
Harddisk:   OCZ Vertex 2 100 GB
Power Supply: CoolerMaster Silent Pro Gold 800W
Case: CoolerMaster HAF X
Fan Controler: Kaze Master Pro 5.25"
Operating System: Win7 64-bit
AMD Driver Catalyst 11.1 CCC

club3d_result


Club 3D CSP-X1000CB PSU is classified as triple-VGA ready, but let us look at the included cables. Two PCI Express 6+2 pin connectors are among the non-modular cables whereas connecting two modular cables will give four additional PCI Express connectors (8-pin and 6+2 pin). This is enough for a triple VGA setup.

However, we could not connect the second PCI Express modular cable as we used the PSU’s other 8-pin out to connect the CPU’s ATX12V cable. To be honest, we didn’t need the fourth PCI Express cable for dual-CrossFire, nor did we have to connect the second ATX12V CPU cable, but high-end users might need these. It looks like Club 3D made an oversight here by including more cables than you can actually connect.

club-3d-1000W-PSU-connectors

club-3d-1000W-PSU-box-5

(Page 4 of 5)
Last modified on Friday, 18 February 2011 08:50
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Comments  

 
0 #1 robert3892 2011-02-18 08:56
Not a bad start for making their first lineup of PSUs but for the higher rated PSUs I would have split the 12 volt rails into 2 rather than 4 rails
 
 
0 #2 hsew 2011-02-20 19:42
Can we get DC Output Quality (a.k.a. Ripple) results? And maybe some Hot-box results too if you're feeling up to it?
 

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