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Saturday, 05 March 2011 15:51

Cooler Master working on new water cooler

Written by Slobodan Simic
coolermaster

Cebit 2011: The Project A-L2
It's been a while since we've seen a water cooler from Cooler Master but judging from the A-L2 prototype unit showcased at Cebit, this will change pretty soon.

The Project A-L2 as Cooler Master calls it for now will be a sealed, ready to use, water cooling system for CPU. Although it is similar to the water cooling systems from CoolIT and Asetek, Cooler Master is proud to say that this one is all theirs.

The A-L2 features a large radiator cooled by a single fan and a pump/block system. Most of those similar water cooling systems have a rather noisy pump, but Cooler Master's engineer behind this project told us that this one will end up to be pretty silent compared to others on the market. One other noticeable thing is the special block that should improve the transfer of the heat and thus make this water cooling system pretty unique.

The A-L2 should appear in reatil sometimes in May with a price set at below US $100.

coolermaster_al2_1

coolermaster_al2_2

Last modified on Saturday, 05 March 2011 17:25

Slobodan Simic

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Comments  

 
+2 #1 Tasty Taste 2011-03-05 17:34
i'd love to put a push pull config on that in my case, nice
 
 
+4 #2 Bl0bb3r 2011-03-05 18:57
OMG! Like O M G !

OK, nerdstuff and jokes aside... it uses norprene tubing and clamps! If that's how they will market they will make a lot of modders happy! The sink it has isn't enough, just unclamp it and add a 240 for better results or a 360 if you're one of those guys that like to have it big.

The pump seems bulky but at least they seem to have equipped it with a proper clip, looks solid enough compared to those thin tin clips Asetek uses which look kinda flimsy.
 
 
+5 #3 Regenweald 2011-03-05 19:41
The point of closed loops are no maintenance, if they're using clamps, then you have to worry about evaporation and refilling, the two main strong points of closed loop all in ones.

Unless that's just an engineering sample and the final will be properly sealed. Otherwise, I'm glad to see someone else enter the field, because my first impression was another Asetek or CoolIt rebrand. Always a good idea to read the article before one comments :)
 
 
+2 #4 Bl0bb3r 2011-03-06 01:21
The point of closed loops are warranty-voidance on fiddling with the product. Nothing more.

Evaporation happens anyway through the tubing. Doesn't matter out of what it is, elastomer, pvc, etc it still happens.
 
 
-4 #5 tekken 2011-03-07 00:45
Quoting Bl0bb3r:
Evaporation happens anyway through the tubing. Doesn't matter out of what it is, elastomer, pvc, etc it still happens.


LOL.
 
 
+2 #6 rickster 2011-03-07 04:12
Quoting tekken:
Quoting Bl0bb3r:
Evaporation happens anyway through the tubing. Doesn't matter out of what it is, elastomer, pvc, etc it still happens.


LOL.


Uhhh, he's right you know. Even in a closed loop system, very small amounts of vapor do sneak out. Technical term is porosity. It's negligible though, because by the time you get around to your first flush, water levels should hardly have changed.

While these all-in-one systems are good for the price, I'd still recommend to friends, especially overclockers, to just spend the money on the Swiftech Edge systems.
 
 
-1 #7 genetix 2011-03-07 10:23
That thing actually looks alot better than Corsair H60 I could easily compare to H70 even. The base is not fenced like corsair instead there's some idea behind it and the copper has half-round in the pump side. What goes to being loud of course anyone can stick a decent cooler to this, but I wouldn't exactly start by considering that it would be loud to judge how the heat it dispatched.
 
 
-3 #8 tekken 2011-03-07 20:43
Quoting rickster:
Uhhh, he's right you know. Even in a closed loop system, very small amounts of vapor do sneak out. Technical term is porosity. It's negligible though, because by the time you get around to your first flush, water levels should hardly have changed.


Actually, no he is not right.

The evaporation due to porosity of the material in the hoses is negligible compared to the tolerances in the joints, which are orders of magnitude larger than the pores in the tubing (assuming that these companies have done their homework and chose the correct material, you never know). So most of the molecules escape through the joints not the tubing itself. Thus indeed LOL to the original poster's comment. :D
 
 
+2 #9 rickster 2011-03-07 21:19
Quoting tekken:
Actually, no he is not right.

The evaporation due to porosity of the material in the hoses is negligible compared to the tolerances in the joints, which are orders of magnitude larger than the pores in the tubing (assuming that these companies have done their homework and chose the correct material, you never know). So most of the molecules escape through the joints not the tubing itself. Thus indeed LOL to the original poster's comment. :D


Yes, he is. A very minute amount does escape through the tubing itself. You just said it yourself. While it is negligible, it's still fact.
 
 
+1 #10 Bl0bb3r 2011-03-07 23:46
tekken, I'd LOL you but I ran out of O's when reading your post.

1. You do realize that what you're talking about is called leakage not evaporation?

2. I never said "most", I just said that is happens while you exaggerated to prove your three letter reply.

3. The part with the "joins", what you may be referring to are called fittings. The gap that forms between the tubing and them, if we were to sum it all up, is less than that of the whole pores of the entire tubing. Never mind that when heated, the fittings dilate and squeeze the tubing even harder on the clamps, better molding on the fitting reducing gaps as oppose to the normal, non-compressed "rubber", which leave pores as they are.
 

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