Featured Articles

Analyst reveals Apple Watch spec

Analyst reveals Apple Watch spec

An analyst has examined the Apple Watch supply chain in an effort to ascertain the exact spec of Cupertino’s new gadget…

More...
Nvidia's first 20nm product is a mobile SoC

Nvidia's first 20nm product is a mobile SoC

For much of the year we were under the impression that the second generation Maxwell will end up as a 20nm…

More...
Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Nvidia adjusts GTX 980 and GTX 970 pricing

Nvidia adjusts GTX 980 and GTX 970 pricing

It appears that Nvidia has been feeling the pulse of the market and took some note from comments regarding the original…

More...
PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

Today we will take a look at the PowerColor TurboDuo Radeon R9 285. The card is based on AMD’s new…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 11 May 2011 14:24

Intel switching to PowerVR for next gen Atom

Written by Slobodan Simic
intel_insidenew_logo

PowerVR SGX545 graphics core

According to the slide posted over at VR-Zone.com, Intel will switch to PowerVR's SGX545 GPU in its upcoming Cedarview Atom CPU platform.

Of course, the new GPU path that Intel is taking with the upcoming Cedar Trail Atom doesn't bring anything new as, after all, the famous GMA 500 And GMA 600 were actually based on PowerVR's SGX535 graphics core. The good side of the story is that there will probably a significant boost in GPU performance, on paper at least. The new GPU will be clocked at 640MHz for the destop part and at 400MHz for the mobile one. These clocks are significantly faster than the original 200MHz clock that PowerVR used for this GPU.

The "new GPU" brings support for DirectX 10.1 and OpenGL 3.1 and hardware accelerated video decoding for MPEG-2, MPEG-4 part 2, VC1, WMV9 and H.264. Other noted specs on the slide include a single channel 24-bit LVDS display outputs with a resolution of up to 1440x900 coupled with eDP 1.1 as well as support for external D-Sub, HDMI 1.3a and Displayport 1.1. The memory is still limited to single channel but Intel upped maximum capacity to 4GB and threw in support for DDR3 1067MHz memory.

You can find the original slide and more info here.


Last modified on Wednesday, 11 May 2011 16:22
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments