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Wednesday, 11 May 2011 14:24

Intel switching to PowerVR for next gen Atom

Written by Slobodan Simic
intel_insidenew_logo

PowerVR SGX545 graphics core

According to the slide posted over at VR-Zone.com, Intel will switch to PowerVR's SGX545 GPU in its upcoming Cedarview Atom CPU platform.

Of course, the new GPU path that Intel is taking with the upcoming Cedar Trail Atom doesn't bring anything new as, after all, the famous GMA 500 And GMA 600 were actually based on PowerVR's SGX535 graphics core. The good side of the story is that there will probably a significant boost in GPU performance, on paper at least. The new GPU will be clocked at 640MHz for the destop part and at 400MHz for the mobile one. These clocks are significantly faster than the original 200MHz clock that PowerVR used for this GPU.

The "new GPU" brings support for DirectX 10.1 and OpenGL 3.1 and hardware accelerated video decoding for MPEG-2, MPEG-4 part 2, VC1, WMV9 and H.264. Other noted specs on the slide include a single channel 24-bit LVDS display outputs with a resolution of up to 1440x900 coupled with eDP 1.1 as well as support for external D-Sub, HDMI 1.3a and Displayport 1.1. The memory is still limited to single channel but Intel upped maximum capacity to 4GB and threw in support for DDR3 1067MHz memory.

You can find the original slide and more info here.


Last modified on Wednesday, 11 May 2011 16:22
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Comments  

 
+5 #1 The blue fox 2011-05-11 17:23
650Mhz clock? maybe this will preform as well as my old Nvidia 6600 TC.
 
 
0 #2 johndgr 2011-05-11 17:31
Nvidia? Last year.
 
 
+23 #3 Jermelescu 2011-05-11 20:01
Never understood why the big dog (INTEL) sucked so much at making a good gpu.
 
 
+2 #4 Blizzard 2011-05-11 21:03
Quoting Jermelescu:
Never understood why the big dog (INTEL) sucked so much at making a good gpu.


And AMD was the same, maybe more lame, until strategic buy that was one of most genius movement did! ok with big problems with huge loses in cash. But imagine how bad maybe AMD positioned now if that transaction did not come like that. AMD with huge loses in other part ATi with terrible loses and ... dead maybe...

And for the question, legacy that ATi and nVidia have can't be just ignored - an direction of 25 years work just on that type of technology. The same as ARM vs Intel (hm... and here Intel can be more powerful than against GPU) the same is for nVidia the fact that they desperate need a processing unit...
 
 
0 #5 Blizzard 2011-05-11 21:43
what i want to say, that is, of how much cash you would have, you won't reinvent the periodic table that good like some one did for a period of life, with own experience and direction of specialization.
 
 
+1 #6 pogsnet 2011-05-11 23:20
It's not about cash. It's about right people and right leadership. Even small companies can make better technologies with given small amount of funding necessary for them to design and create new one. It's where geniuses are born, out of necessity, out of curiousness and the likes. That's why bigger companies tend to buy smaller companies with technological background than building a new one. Best people are hard to find, you can't find genius people based on credentials, look steve jobs is a drop out, and many other scientists who made great inventions.
 
 
0 #7 dicobalt 2011-05-12 00:00
Quoting Jermelescu:
Never understood why the big dog (INTEL) sucked so much at making a good gpu.


They suck because they don't really try.

They also sucked at their dedicated GPU because they wanted to do something weird, wild, and all new, instead of something sensible and conventional.

This isn't the end of Intel licensing graphics.
 
 
+2 #8 Blizzard 2011-05-12 00:29
Quoting pogsnet:
It's not about cash....

I agree on your point, but indeed Intel maybe can create a good GPU, they tried, but will always have that delay of time and after all bring something non-competitive, best thing, is to buy nVidia, that is not for sale, for the moment, (and curious to see how AMD won't push very much pressure on nVidia to keep them competitive), if that happens we for sore all be lost in intel's monopoly, that is one of the reason way i take AMD part. Other part of buys you describe is not in idea to bring just smart people, but in 1st place for key patents those small companies posses (in many cases the science is made in Universities).
Is much easier to buy an working process (and chipper in terms of time and cash) than to create one.
 
 
-7 #9 Bl0bb3r 2011-05-12 09:06
If both intel and nvidia would grow a neuron, they could just combine their efforts and put something good out, but no... uptight CEO's won't allow that.
 
 
-10 #10 bro_fist 2011-05-12 11:13
Quoting Bl0bb3r:
If both intel and nvidia would grow a neuron, they could just combine their efforts and put something good out, but no... uptight CEO's won't allow that.


They are generous. If they do it, AMDfags will go bankrupt. :-|
 

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