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Monday, 13 June 2011 07:44

Latest 360 slims feature SoC

Written by David Stellmack


Better efficiency and less heat
Microsoft has confirmed that the latest Xbox 360 slim consoles use a new SoC (system-on-chip) processor, rather than having multiple chips. The chip that is being produced by IBM/Global Foundries is using a 45nm process and combines the tri-core CPU, AMD/ATI GPU, dual channel memory controller, and I/O onto a single chip with a new front side bus. The concept of the design is similar in strategy to AMD’s Fusion and Intel’s Sandy Bridge offerings.

Of course, the move to the SoC allows Microsoft to reduce cost, but it also greatly reduces heat and increases power efficiency; these are two areas that Microsoft has been improving with each generation of Xbox 360 that has been released.

The 372 million transistors that make up the new SoC chip that Microsoft has developed took the company 5 years of research and development to make happen. Microsoft has paid special attention to guaranteeing compatibility, and to this end has implemented precision latency and bandwidth throttling that perfectly impersonates the older Xbox systems which used separate chips to make up the console.

David Stellmack

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Comments  

 
+13 #1 Sodomy 2011-06-13 07:52
while it took em like 5 years to get it right (assuming this removes the RROD and heat issues), on the bright side at lest they can use this tech in their next console.
 
 
0 #2 Jurassic1024 2011-06-13 08:10
Quoting Sodomy:
while it took em like 5 years to get it right (assuming this removes the RROD and heat issues), on the bright side at lest they can use this tech in their next console.


Five years to get it right? RROD's haven't been an issue for a few years now. Anyone that had an RROD early on and qualify for the extended warranty, currently have a new revision XBOX (better cooling/Heatsinks etc), which would explain why XBOX RROD's haven't been in the headlines, and only here in some comment section.

This article is about cutting costs... not RROD's, or other system failures.
 
 
+9 #3 Boomstick777 2011-06-13 08:17
The Xbox 360 has been using a combo GPU/CPU since 2010! Codename 'Valhalla' its in every Xbox 360 slim released... Curious as to why mention it now?
 
 
-4 #4 Sodomy 2011-06-13 08:45
@Jurassic1024:
or maybe the reason you don't hear about RRoD anymore is because they are expected, and everyday part of life.

also do a quick xbox 360 fail rates google sreach and you will see that the figure (which MS faisl to release) is anywhere between 20-55%

also the xbox slim can't have a RRoD the outside lights don't turn red, now the dot does (RDoD), sooooo technically your right
 
 
+4 #5 loadwick 2011-06-13 09:02
@Broomstick,
Not 100% on this but unless Fudzilla are years behind the times i am guessing they are trying to say that the CPU and GPU are being intergrated into a single die, hence the Fusion / Sandy Bridge comparision. The earlier SoC versions were just 2 seperate dies on a single chip.

Its a shame they have to 'throttle' the performance as some games still go down to 5fps at times which could be elliminated.
 
 
+5 #6 FlOw 2011-06-13 09:47
Quoting loadwick:
@Broomstick,
Not 100% on this but unless Fudzilla are years behind the times i am guessing they are trying to say that the CPU and GPU are being intergrated into a single die, hence the Fusion / Sandy Bridge comparision. The earlier SoC versions were just 2 seperate dies on a single chip.

Its a shame they have to 'throttle' the performance as some games still go down to 5fps at times which could be elliminated.


Indeed, they could easily make the 360 much faster but that might break compatibility and bla bla. I hope the next gen consoles will be designed to allow increased clockspeeds as yields improve. Seems like a waste having chips capable of doing 4.2ghz and gimping them to 3.2(random guess but plausible)
 
 
+16 #7 Kryojenix 2011-06-13 10:08
Quoting FlOw:
I hope the next gen consoles will be designed to allow increased clockspeeds as yields improve. Seems like a waste having chips capable of doing 4.2ghz and gimping them to 3.2(random guess but plausible)

Sounds like you want to be a PC gamer, Friend. ;-)
 
 
+11 #8 FlOw 2011-06-13 10:15
Quoting Kryojenix:
Sounds like you want to be a PC gamer, Friend. ;-)


I Already am one :P
 
 
-1 #9 dan 2011-06-13 10:44
This has been known for months? WAKE UP DAVID and quote some sources for once.
 
 
+6 #10 Harry Lloyd 2011-06-13 11:10
Now that's what we call progress - introducing latency and throttling.
 

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