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Thursday, 21 July 2011 10:26

OCZ introduces Indilinx Everest controller

Written by Slobodan Simic
ocz_logo

Dual ARM, SATA 6.0Gbps and 1TB
OCZ has announced the latest thing in SSD tech, the Indilinx Everest controller and platform. Packing a SATA 6.0Gbps interface and support for SSDs with capacity of up to 1TB, the new controller should put OCZ ahead of the competition, at least according to what we are hearing for those close to the company.

The controller itself packs dual-core ARM CPU, features support for Triple-Level Cell (TLC) NAND with addition to Indilinx Ndurance tech, up to 512MB of 400MHz DDR3 DRAM cache, high sequential speeds with up to 500MB/s, high transactional perfromance optimized for 4K to 16K compressed files and up to 8channels of ONFI 2.0/Toggle 1.0 flash at up to 200MT/s with up to 16-way interleaving.

The Everest platform also comes with enhanced power fail protection, support for 1xnm node NAND flash, dynamic/static wear-leveling and background garbage collection thatnks to efficient NAND flash management, boot time reduction optimizations, TRIM, SMART and NCQ support, and end-to-end data protection and probably much more.

The platform is currently heading to OEMs for validation and there has been no talks regarding the actual product from OCZ based on the Everest platform. Don't quote us on this one, but let's just say that we wouldn't be surprised to see a Vertex 4 SSD in the near future.

Last modified on Thursday, 21 July 2011 10:30
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Comments  

 
0 #1 themassau 2011-07-21 11:08
means this that OCZ will leave sandforce because they made a better controller?
 
 
0 #2 Skynet 2011-07-21 11:54
I don't know about anyone else but its not the speed of SSDs that puts me off buying one its simply the price per GB.

Even if this drive is 2x as fast or 10x as fast i still wouldn't buy one as a few seconds saved on start up or launching an app just isn't worth the price.

I have about 12Tb of photos, videos and programs and the only time i wish i had an SSD is when i open a folder with a few thousand thumb nails in it and they don't load instantly. But an SSD wouldn't help me unless i had that folder on the drive and give the price and size i probably wouldn't.

Anyone know if i used an SSD and Intel's Smart Response Technology it would help with that? i.e. would it cache all my thumb nails?
 
 
0 #3 themassau 2011-07-21 15:55
Quoting Skynet:
Anyone know if i used an SSD and Intel's Smart Response Technology it would help with that? i.e. would it cache all my thumb nails?

i don't think so but you can set the thumbnails at a lower quality which would load them quicker. i also strongly recommand a raid array for you because of that amount of photos and ssd's are now ment for like setting your fav programs and your os on it so it would launch fast.
 
 
0 #4 Skynet 2011-07-21 17:35
I did used to have some drives RAIDed up but my system is a little flaky and every now and then Windows will unallocate one of my drives which can be a little scary but software can retrieve it pretty easily on a single drive but i believe its much harder when in raid.
 
 
0 #5 JAB Creations 2011-07-22 07:43
Quoting Skynet:
its not the speed of SSDs that puts me off buying one its simply the price per GB.



You can get a couple of SATA3 (6Gbps) 60/64GB drives for about $99 and set them up in a RAID 0. Yeah, $200 for 120-128GB is still a lot though last year I paid nearly $400 for my 128GB Corsair SSD which is now apparently a third the speed of the current drives. If you wait another year the drives should end up approaching the $1/1GB ratio at the current rate. The 120/128GB drives with decent controllers are starting to approach the $200 mark right now.
 
 
0 #6 crackerz 2011-07-22 08:41
Quoting Skynet:
Even if this drive is 2x as fast or 10x as fast i still wouldn't buy one as a few seconds saved on start up or launching an app just isn't worth the price.



Did you ever work with an ssd? if you are a power user and you try an ssd you cannot go back - I have a vertex 2 (60gb).. loading my programs and more than 4-5 programs at the same time and works smooth like having only one. When you have an hdd and open 4-5 and more programs the whole systems is dead slow.

The true power of an ssd is when the system is under pressure for example having 10 programs open, 50 websites open and running a game and the system will still be smooth while on HDD you will see the mouse lagging(frame by frame)
 

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