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Thursday, 08 September 2011 10:38

Police investigate how they became Apple's secret police

Written by Nick Farell
apple

Rules being broken
The San Francisco Police Department is investigating how four of its ununiformed cops ended up being Apple's secret enforcers. The SFPD is becoming more embarrassed by the incident which appears to have broken every rule in the book and shows them to be the taxpayer paid enforcers for Jobs' mob.

When an iPhone 5 prototype went missing six people knocked on the door of Sergio Calderón. Apple's security was convinced that the phone was on the premises thanks to the latest technology it has for tracking fanboys.

Two of the people who attended were black shirted members of Apple's security, who are known by the nick name of the Stasi. The rest were real cops, and the owner of the house let Apple staff snoop around assuming that was the case.

SFPD spokesman Lt. Troy Dangerfield said that the police department was looking into the manner in which four plainclothes officers assisted two Apple Stasi. For some reason the cops have no record of the four taking time off from fighting crime to act as Apple security staff. The fact they were there at all creates some fairly serious questions.

Calderón said that the people who showed up at his door said they were SFPD officers, but there was no record of a visit to his home. The police who showed up said they were only there as observers and stayed outside while the Apple security officers searched.

But there are some other somewhat tacky parts to the story. The Apple staff apparently threatened Calderon that they would expose the immigration status of his relatives if he didn't agree to the search of his home. Legally that is considered extortion, and any cops involved would be violating the searched party's constitutional rights.

The phone did not turn up at the Calderon address so the whole thing is turning out to be a huge embarrassment for both Apple and the fuzz.


Nick Farell

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Comments  

 
+3 #1 Th3pwn3r 2011-09-08 15:06
Apple dun goofed.
 
 
+1 #2 mrmessma 2011-09-08 20:31
There should have at least been a record of the visit made at the station, however I don't believe that this showed up on their time sheets.
 
 
+1 #3 markhahn 2011-09-08 22:52
and this is such a surprise because Apple in the past has been such a solid corporate citizen, right?

Apple sells a fantasy - really well! it's amazing how many people drink the koolaid. that doesn't make them a ruthless money-grubbing corporate monster...
 

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