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Thursday, 15 September 2011 10:34

AMD's new CEO to announce new strategy

Written by Fuad Abazovic
amd

More focus on mobile
We got an insider hint that AMD's new CEO is working hard on a twist in AMD's long-term strategy.

We heard that Rory Read was famous for turning things around and that he helped Lenovo with some key transitions.  Since AMD believes that smartphones and tablets are getting more important, and that they need even better mobile chips, its logical to assume that this new strategy can get AMD closer to these categories.

AMD under Hector was all about servers due to inherent high margins. Dirk Meyer was aware of the importance of notebooks but also paid a lot of attention of desktop and server, while Rory might go more after sleek tablets and ultrathin computers in the future. They might even start working on a phone chip, or acquire someone that already has one.

Trinity and Krishna are a good way towards slimmer notebooks and even tablets in the long run, but AMD can probably do even more to get itself closer to mobile computing revolution. We will keep our eyes open to see if Rory Read can turn things around.


Fuad Abazovic

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Comments  

 
0 #1 dicobalt 2011-09-15 12:18
AMD definitely needs to focus on lower power chips. They need to be able to match Intel's 10-15W Ivy Bridge and Haswell. I would love to see x86 replace ARM on other devices too. Enough of this wacko hyper proprietary ARM stuff.
 
 
0 #2 yourma2000 2011-09-15 13:12
Maybe when 14nm is reached and trigate is an option for AMD then low power chips will be worth the effort.
 
 
+1 #3 dan 2011-09-15 20:28
Quoting dicobalt:
AMD definitely needs to focus on lower power chips. They need to be able to match Intel's 10-15W Ivy Bridge and Haswell. I would love to see x86 replace ARM on other devices too. Enough of this wacko hyper proprietary ARM stuff.


Are you dumb? How is ARM any more proprietary than x86? It's far more open, you just need to buy a licence and you can make chips. Forget that with x86.

Ivy will not be 10-15W. Krishna will be, and will destroy Ivy for a lot of 3D / gpu applications.
 
 
-2 #4 Squall_Leonhart 2011-09-15 21:24
new strategy

try not to suck so much
 
 
+1 #5 dew111 2011-09-15 22:34
Quoting dan:
How is ARM any more proprietary than x86?




Windows, Linux and any other OS compiled for x86 can run on almost any x86 machine. ARM's ISA is fairly rigid, but the system implementations are radically different. x86 Pcs use PCIe and some other standards for interconnects, but ARM platforms currently don't share a common platform standard. You can't just throw Windows on ARM or Android on any hardware platform and expect it to work. Each hardware implementation will require a custom build of the OS. In this manner, ARM platforms are more proprietary than x86 platforms. The x86 ISA is unquestionably more proprietary than the ARM ISAs.
 
 
+1 #6 JEskandari 2011-09-17 13:13
Quoting dew111:
Windows, Linux and any other OS compiled for x86 can run on almost any x86 machine. ARM's ISA is fairly rigid, but the system implementations are radically different. x86 Pcs use PCIe and some other standards for interconnects, but ARM platforms currently don't share a common platform standard. You can't just throw Windows on ARM or Android on any hardware platform and expect it to work. Each hardware implementation will require a custom build of the OS. In this manner, ARM platforms are more proprietary than x86 platforms. The x86 ISA is unquestionably more proprietary than the ARM ISAs.


then I must ask you how Microsoft managed to build Windows 8 or how
on Earth NVIDIA want to made Kal-el available for Notebooks ?
 
 
0 #7 JAB Creations 2011-09-18 17:06
Quoting dew111:
ARM's ISA is fairly rigid



ARM was built to be a processing instruction buffet: you choose what optimizations you want in YOUR ARM chip and I choose the optimizations I want in MY ARM chip. That is one of the reasons ARM is so popular. As far as a unification of ARM processors I think that is subjective to collaboration between primary ARM clients. I think M$ stated that the ARM processors would not be interchangeably supported for Windows 8.
 

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