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Friday, 16 September 2011 11:41

Italian security expert releases list of industry vulnerabilities

Written by Nick Farell
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Computers are vulnerable
An Italian insecurity expert is telling the world+dog about a huge list unpatched vulnerabilities and detailed proof-of-concept exploits that allow hackers to completely compromise major industrial control systems.

Luigi Auriemma has revealed details of the attacks against six SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) systems including US giant Rockwell Automation. His step-by-step exploits will allow allow attackers to execute full remote compromises and denial of service attacks.

This would give hackers control of SCADA systems were used in power, water and waste distribution and agriculture.
Auriemma appears to have broken the rules by publishing details of the attacks before anyone had time to fix them. He did not seem sorry about it. He blamed developers for the mistakes.


Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
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Comments  

 
+1 #1 recalc_task_prio 2011-09-16 12:12
Luigi's site also includes useful tools ;-)
 
 
0 #2 a1927 2011-09-16 14:18
Not sure about Italian laws but in some countries that would make him an accomplice to a hacker if somebody staged a successful attack within reasonably short period of time.
 
 
-1 #3 dicobalt 2011-09-16 16:22
Either the attacks are very simple due to huge fundamental mistakes or this guy is a total douchebag. Maybe both.
 

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