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Monday, 19 September 2011 11:31

Big companies still don't get internet

Written by Nick Farell
y_globe

Losing millions
Some of the world's biggest companies are losing hundreds of millions of pounds by failing to keep their websites and smartphone apps working properly.

Boffins at Oxford Economics named and shamed some of the UK's top retailers by saying that they had lost up to £500m in annual sales by "neglecting" their online sales potential. Sam Moore, director of consulting services at Oxford Economics said there was a clear link between growth and multi-channel performance. Companies need to invest in a digital multi-channel strategy.

The worst performer was Morrisons, the UKs fourth-biggest supermarket. The Yorkshire-based chain is losing up to £314m in potential digital sales by not offering an internet shopping and home delivery service. Rival Tesco, which offers a plethora of digital services including web and phone-based services, is said to have made an extra £255m from its online efforts.

Morrisons have announced plans to launch its web-based food delivery service by 2013 and has hired Simon Thompson, Apple's former internet store director, to help drive its long-awaited move online. But it is a lot of cash to lose.


Nick Farell

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