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Tuesday, 27 September 2011 11:57

Apple denied multi-touch trademark

Written by Nedim Hadzic
apple

Again
The United States Patent and Trademark Office has once again denied Apple’s trademark on the term multi-touch.

Apple originally applied for the trademark back in January 2007, when it launched the iPhone, but the application was unsuccessful. The appeal didn’t have much luck either.

The appeal was dismissed as the trademark attorney thinks the term multitouch is pretty much generic by now. It was concluded that the term does not only identify the technology underneath, but rather describes a method of usage of a device.

The Trademark Office's statement reads:”We now consider whether applicant has submitted sufficient evidence to establish acquired distinctiveness of this highly descriptive term. There is a list of items that can determine if a mark has "acquired distinctiveness", including sales success, length and exclusivity of use, and advertising expenditures.”

Well, they can always try to trademark the sense of touch, if the Vatican doesn't beat them to it.

You can find the full decision here.


Last modified on Tuesday, 27 September 2011 12:07

Nedim Hadzic

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