Featured Articles

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel has released a 3G cellular modem with an integrated power amplifier that fits into a 300 mm2 footprint, claiming it…

More...
Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

It's not all rosy in the house of Intel. It seems that upcoming Atom out-of-order cores might be giving this semiconductor…

More...
TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC will start producing 16nm wafers in the first quarter of 2015. Sometime in the second quarter production should ramp up…

More...
Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S is the ‘tock’ of the Haswell architecture and despite being delayed from the original plan, this desktop part is scheduled…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 27 September 2011 11:57

Apple denied multi-touch trademark

Written by Nedim Hadzic
apple

Again
The United States Patent and Trademark Office has once again denied Apple’s trademark on the term multi-touch.

Apple originally applied for the trademark back in January 2007, when it launched the iPhone, but the application was unsuccessful. The appeal didn’t have much luck either.

The appeal was dismissed as the trademark attorney thinks the term multitouch is pretty much generic by now. It was concluded that the term does not only identify the technology underneath, but rather describes a method of usage of a device.

The Trademark Office's statement reads:”We now consider whether applicant has submitted sufficient evidence to establish acquired distinctiveness of this highly descriptive term. There is a list of items that can determine if a mark has "acquired distinctiveness", including sales success, length and exclusivity of use, and advertising expenditures.”

Well, they can always try to trademark the sense of touch, if the Vatican doesn't beat them to it.

You can find the full decision here.


Last modified on Tuesday, 27 September 2011 12:07

Nedim Hadzic

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments