Featured Articles

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel has released a 3G cellular modem with an integrated power amplifier that fits into a 300 mm2 footprint, claiming it…

More...
Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

It's not all rosy in the house of Intel. It seems that upcoming Atom out-of-order cores might be giving this semiconductor…

More...
TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC will start producing 16nm wafers in the first quarter of 2015. Sometime in the second quarter production should ramp up…

More...
Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S is the ‘tock’ of the Haswell architecture and despite being delayed from the original plan, this desktop part is scheduled…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 07 November 2011 11:50

US needs to be more open about cyber weapons

Written by Nick Farell

y globe

Have to step up our game

The US military needs to be more open about its development of offensive cyber weapons and spell out when it will use them as it grapples with an increasing barrage of attacks by foreign hackers. A former Number 2 uniformed officer James Cartwright said that the US needed to step up its game and talk about its offensive capabilities and train to them.

Cartwright, who was a four-star Marine Corps general said that by making a bigger song and dance about what the US can do would help to act as a deterrent to hackers. Cartwright told Reuters that the increasing intensity and frequency of network attacks by hackers underscored the need for an effective deterrent.

Something which is secret can't deter anyone, because if you don't know it's there, it doesn't scare you. Current and former U.S. officials are tight-lipped about any specific weapons. However, it is widely acknowledged the United States has both offensive and defensive ways to respond to escalating and increasingly destructive attacks from foreign parts.

More here.



Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments