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Wednesday, 16 November 2011 11:57

Cyber-security skills shortage coming

Written by Nick Farell

y exclamation

Governments want the experts


As governments recognising the need for cyber security strategies, (ISC)², which is the information security professional body has warned that there is not enough skilled staff out there.

There is an element of “it would say that” as it administrators the CISSP certificate for cyber security strategies. However, its comments do strike us as likely. It has called on national governments to recognise the requirement for internationally recognised skills, principals and practices to tackle what is a very sophisticated global threat landscape. With its own research anticipating a doubling of the workforce by 2015.

(ISC)² said that cyber security is rising up as a priority in political arenas, as evidenced by the recent London cyber security conference attended by world leaders from 60 countries; however, the skills and competency requirements do not appear to be high on the international discussion agenda.

A spokesman for (ISC)², John Colley, said that while many countries are examining the capacity and competencies required for national security, but there is a risk of too much focus on national politics rather than a real understanding of what is required. “They should be careful not to work in isolation,” he warns, adding that “nationally focused schemes risk confusion in a landscape that requires an ability to communicate and operate across borders,” Colley said.

Nick Farell

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