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Monday, 12 December 2011 12:37

Google rolls out Ipv6 for itself

Written by Nick Farell



The rest of the world can wait


Google has rolled out Ipv6 across its internal networks as the world starts to run out of Ipv4 addresses.

The search engine outfit was expecting to have rolled out Ipv6 ages ago but according to IT World it took a lot longer than company engineers anticipated. Google network engineer Irena Nikolova told  Usenix Large Installation System Administration (LISA) conference that an IPv6 migration involves more than just updating the software and hardware. She said it requires buy-in from management and staff, particularly administrators who already are juggling too many tasks.

Early adopters need to spend shedloads of time working with vendors to get them to fix buggy and still-unfinished code. Things that should be supported often turn out to not work, she said. The project, which has been under way for about four years and is only half way finished. But the company has made significant gains in this time. About 95 percent of Google's engineers now have IPv6 access on their desks. Eventually, the company plans to have an IPv6-only network.

Nick Farell

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