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Wednesday, 21 December 2011 11:21

US removes Baidu from blacklist

Written by Nick Farell



We like what you are doing to stop piracy


The United States has removed China's largest search engine, from its list of notorious markets for piracy.

Baidu has been bigger and more notorious than Christopher Wallace who was Notorious B.I.G. as far as the big studios are concerned. However in July it signed an agreement with top music studios to distribute licensed songs through its mp3 search service, ending a legal dispute over accusations the company encouraged piracy.

Alibaba Group's Taobao unit  is still on the United States Trade Representative's November notorious markets list for offering a wide range of copyright infringing products.

"Several commentators reported that pirated and counterfeit goods continue to be widely available on China-based Taobao. While stakeholders report that Taobao continues to make significant efforts to address the problem, they recognize that much remains to be done," USTR said in its report on Tuesday.

The report also complained that Chinese music websites, Sogou Mp3 and Gougou were providing "deep linking" services to copyrighted music. Currently four of the 15 public enemies of the music and film industry are based in China, USTR said.


Nick Farell

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