Featured Articles

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

Research firm IHS got hold of Samsung’s new flagship smartphone and took it apart to the last bolt to figure out…

More...
Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Samsung’s Galaxy S5 has finally gone on sale and it can be yours for €699, which is quite a lot of…

More...
Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel has added a load of Haswell refresh parts to its official price list and there really aren’t any surprises to…

More...
Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

During his appearance at PAX East panel and confirmed on Twitter, Titanfall developer Respawn confirmed that the first DLC pack for…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 21 December 2011 11:51

Music industry loses a key anti-copyright case

Written by Nick Farell



Veoh was right all along


Universal was been walloped in a long-running copyright court case against Veoh.

The studio wanted to shut the now-defunct video hosting site, but it turned out that Veoh had a right to exist after all. A federal judge upheld a previous ruling that the Digital Millennium Copyright Act's safe harbour provision protected Veoh from liability when users uploaded videos that infringed on UMG's intellectual property.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation said it was a  "a bittersweet and crucial victory" for the Internet as a whole. Veoh died because it could not afford to take on the deep pockets of the movie studios.

The ruling by the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in San Francisco rejected UMG's reasoning for filing takedown notices. The court remanded the question of whether Veoh will get the costs that sunk it back to the US District Court.

Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

Comments  

 
+4 #1 pogsnet 2011-12-21 13:09
Yeah same as youtube, it may be infringing but it is not youtube's fault, same as radio stations, you think we cant record music from there? It is much easier now than cassette age.

Intentional infringing is obvious but those content uploaded by the user is not the host's fault. Catch all the user, now you will have no listener.
 
 
+2 #2 nECrO 2011-12-21 19:04
On one hand Universal really wins because they were able to bankrupt away what they didn't like. But on the other hand, and much more importantly, a precedent was set. Now that that precedent is set, it should be a lot easier (and cheaper) for small websites to defend themselves. I say SHOULD because, well, this is America and politicians and justice are always for sale...
 
 
0 #3 Fud_u 2011-12-22 01:20
Censorship is communism. Don't believed me? Go to a communist country and you'll miss everything we have here.
 

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments