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Thursday, 22 December 2011 12:18

Engineers in short supply across the pond

Written by Nick Farell



Green card anyone?


The Land of the Free is desperately short of engineers who will work in the earthquake infested Silicon Valley.

A report from startup Identified claims that people with engineering degrees on Identified have Identified scores that are 1.2 times those of liberal arts majors with equivalent work experience, meaning they are more sought after for jobs. In non-technical fields, people with engineering degrees are still more wanted than liberal arts majors with the same years of work experience. After five years of experience, those with engineering degrees in technical fields had a score of 68, compared with a 60 for engineers in non-technical fields and 51 for liberal arts majors.

Tech executives and venture investors have gotten behind the Startup Visa idea, which would enable immigrant founders who create jobs through their new companies to stay in the U.S. That proposal, introduced in March, has not gotten through Congress which is a little worried that it will let more Mexican dishwashers in rather than highly skilled Bosnian programmers. [Will code for food. Ed]

Apparently there’s an increasing demand both from tech companies and non-tech companies for highly-skilled engineers to create, build and maintain high quality systems at various levels from manufacturing to product design. Software is one major area of growth where engineers are needed.

While this has all happened the growth in engineering grads has not kept pace, and the only place to get the is from overseas. Even this is beginning to dry up. The U.S. H1-B Visa program was designed to bring talented “speciality occupations” such as engineers into the US. However the number of engineers using this has been dropping. We guess no one wants to work in a place which is ruled by corporates. In the EU we know our politicians are corrupt, but at least they are obvious about it and don't lecture us on the bible while they do it.

Nick Farell

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Comments  

 
+3 #1 kartikkg 2011-12-22 13:58
highly skilled Bosnian programmers. [Will code for food. Ed].... hahaha nice way to put it
 
 
0 #2 dicobalt 2011-12-22 14:29
I just went back to college to get away from the overly demanding computer/network tech work I was doing. I never considered engineering for a second. With the 80 hour weeks engineers always complain about there is no way you could get me to live in a cubicle again. That's exactly what I'm trying to get away from. Instead I chose a field in medicine that can't be outsourced, always has demand, and doesn't expect people to live at work.
 
 
0 #3 Dagrim 2011-12-22 15:09
'Idiocracy' is happening people!
 
 
0 #4 GrumpyOldMan 2011-12-23 05:02
In non-technical fields, people with engineering degrees are still more wanted

would that be social engineering?

Engineering schools here are expensive. I went to a state school where the best I could do was a degree in chemistry. They had "co-op" programs with some schools but u relocate, need like an A average etc.

Even though we have been told "math and science" ad nauseum, fact is I had to resort to auto mechanics to pay my bills. All BS if you ask me. If I changed my last name to Chen, the phone would be ringing off the hook. Even american employers think other americans are 1) full of shit 2) underachieving idiots.

I want to go EMIGRATE to get work.

.
 

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