Featured Articles

TSMC: Volume production of 16nm FinFET in 2H 2015

TSMC: Volume production of 16nm FinFET in 2H 2015

TSMC has announced that it will begin volume production of 16nm FinFET products in the second half of 2015, in late…

More...
AMD misses earnings targets, announces layoffs

AMD misses earnings targets, announces layoffs

AMD has missed earnings targets and is planning a substantial job cuts. The company reported quarterly earnings yesterday and the street is…

More...
Did Google botch the Nexus 6 and Nexus 9?

Did Google botch the Nexus 6 and Nexus 9?

As expected, Google has finally released the eagerly awaited Nexus 6 phablet and its first 64-bit device, the Nexus 9 tablet.

More...
Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 24 January 2012 12:33

Intel buys Infiniband IP

Written by Nick Farrell



Writes a cheque for $125 million


Intel is pushing into exascale computing by writing a $125 million cheque for InfiniBand patents.

Chipzilla not only bought the InfiniBand IP but seems to have hired the people who run it  from networking processor and software maker QLogic. Qlogic makes Fibre Channel switches, routers, adapters, and ASICs. InfiniBand was a a low-latency, high-bandwidth system interconnect standard that could push  high-speed data over hort distances.

It was designed to be shoved into a data centre or connect two data centres which were geographically close.  The technology could turn a datacentre into one big supercomputer. InfiniBand is used in several enterprise products from companies such as Oracle, Biggish Blue and EMC Isilon.

Exascale computing is supposed to be the next big thing for Supercomputers.  It refers to computing capabilities beyond the currently existing petascale. If Intel manages it, exascale computing would represent a thousandfold increase.

blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments