Featured Articles

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel has released a 3G cellular modem with an integrated power amplifier that fits into a 300 mm2 footprint, claiming it…

More...
Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

It's not all rosy in the house of Intel. It seems that upcoming Atom out-of-order cores might be giving this semiconductor…

More...
TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC will start producing 16nm wafers in the first quarter of 2015. Sometime in the second quarter production should ramp up…

More...
Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S is the ‘tock’ of the Haswell architecture and despite being delayed from the original plan, this desktop part is scheduled…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 06 March 2012 11:28

GitHub hacked

Written by Nick Farrell



Security they have heard of it


GitHub, which is one of the largest repositories of commercial and open source software on the web, has been hacked.

Developer Egor Homakov found a huge hole in GitHub that allowed him to gain administrator access to projects such as Ruby on Rails, Linux, and millions of others. Apparently he found himself with the power to delete the entire history of projects such as jQuery, Node.js, Reddit, and Redis.

GitHub has even outgrown Sourceforge as the best place to pick up software. It is a web-based wrapper around Linus Torvalds’ Git revision control system. The difference is that it has social network features like feeds, friends, and trends. But GitHub has never been hacked even though many people must have known about the flaw. Github uses the Ruby on Rails application framework, and Rails can be taken down using a mass-assignment vulnerability.

Homakov exploited this vulnerability to add his public key to the Rails project on GitHub, which then meant that GitHub identified him as an administrator of the project. GitHub summarily suspended Homakov, fixed the hole, and, after “reviewing his activity,” he has been reinstated.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments