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Monday, 12 March 2012 12:18

BBC turns on Apple

Written by Nick Farrell



Cosy relationship over


It is starting to look like the cosy relationship between Apple and the BBC is about to come to an end after the British broadcaster announced that it is setting up an iTunes rival.

For a while now the BBC has been tailoring its trail content towards the iPad and ignoring PC and Android tablets. But according to reports from PaidContent, the BBC is looking at making all of its programmes available to download to own for an average £1.89 per show. Dubbed ‘Project Barcelona’, it is an attempt to monetise both new and old BBC content.

Project Barcelona could help the corporation make more money to support itself, as the Government advised as the time of capping the fee in 2010.   But the service will give content  producers a greater share of the episode download price (around 40 pence from £1.89) than Apple currently does (which gives them 28 pence on the same price).

The project is “about making what is effectively seen as non-commercial programming available to the market at a price and ease of use that will encourage consumers to purchase programmes that the commercial market would not make available due to the poor returns and risk involved”.

More here.

Nick Farrell

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