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Monday, 07 April 2008 23:55

Boring couple sues Google

Written by Nick Farell

Image

Makes life interesting


Mr. and Mrs. Boring
have decided to sue Google for showing  pictures of their home that appear on the Website's "Street View" feature. The pair claim that Google has violated their privacy, devalued their property and caused them mental suffering.

Aaron and Christine Boring bought the home in Franklin Park, Pennsylvania, a Pittsburgh suburb, in October 2006 for a "considerable sum of money," according to their 10-page lawsuit filed on Wednesday in Allegheny County Common Pleas Court. They decided to by the property because it would give them some privacy, they claimed in court.

To gather the photos, Google uses vehicles with mounted digital cameras to take pictures up and down the streets of cities. The Borings claim the snaps of their driveway, Private Road, violated their privacy. Google said it will fight the case because the search engine has links on the Website that let property owners request that such images be removed if they cite a good reason and can confirm they own the property depicted.

If the Borings had made such a request to Google, especially arguing the images show a view from their private driveway, Google is confident that the image would be removed.

More here.
Last modified on Tuesday, 08 April 2008 04:16

Nick Farell

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